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In addition to contributing film reviews of World Cinema classics to Alt Film Guide, Dan Schneider is the editor of Cosmoetica (http://www.cosmoetica.com/).


Author Archives: Dan Schneider


'Mildred Pierce' 1945: Joan Crawford 'Terrific' in Film Noir or Melodrama?

Joan Crawford in 'Mildred Pierce': Best Actress Oscar winner enjoyed a triumphant comeback. 'Mildred Pierce' 1945 movie review: Very entertaining 'soap opera' Time has a way of making some films seem grander than they really are. A good example is Mildred Pierce, the 1945 black-and-white melodrama directed by Casablanca's Michael Curtiz, and that won star Joan Crawford a Best Actress Oscar. Mildred Pierce is in no way, shape, or form great art, even though it's certainly not a bad film. In fact, as a soap opera it's quite entertaining – no, make that very entertaining; and entertainment is a quality that can stand on its own. (The problem in recent decades is that cinema has become nothing but entertainment.) In […]


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'Mildred Pierce' 1945: Joan Crawford 'Terrific' in Film Noir or Melodrama?



'Fanny and Alexander' Review: Ingmar Bergman Brilliant & Disturbing Film

'Fanny and Alexander' movie: Ingmar Bergman brilliant classic with Bertil Guve as Alexander Ekdahl. 'Fanny and Alexander' movie review: Last Ingmar Bergman 'filmic film' Why Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander / Fanny och Alexander bears its appellation is a mystery – one of many in the director's final 'filmic film' – since the first titular character, Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) is at best a third- or fourth-level supporting character. In fact, in the three-hour theatrical version she is not even mentioned by name for nearly an hour into the film. Fanny and Alexander should have been called “Alexander and Fanny,” or simply “Alexander,” since it most closely follows two years – from 1907 to 1909 – in the life of young, […]


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'Fanny and Alexander' Review: Ingmar Bergman Brilliant & Disturbing Film



'Little Caesar' Movie: Edward G. Robinson Iconic - But Badly Dated - Gangster

Edward G. Robinson, Little Caesar Little Caesar is a good example of a film that is historically important, but that has dated very poorly. Tony Gaudio's camera work is mediocre, Warner Bros. musical director Erno Rapee's spare soundtrack is garbled, and the acting is for the most part wooden. Even Edward G. Robinson, who became a star in this role, is good – but hardly great. What makes Little Caesar's pedestrianism all the more amazing is that just a few months later James Cagney would burst onto the screen with The Public Enemy, a film that holds up far better cinematically – both technically and aesthetically. Directed by Mervyn LeRoy, and adapted by (credited screenwriters) Francis Edward Faragoh and Robert […]


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'Little Caesar' Movie: Edward G. Robinson Iconic - But Badly Dated - Gangster