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Los Angeles Film Critics Association member Tim Cogshell is a veteran L.A.-based Film Critic, Media Journalist, Producer, and Filmmaker. For more than 20 years he has written about film for national and regional magazines and newspapers. Presently, Tim is a regular film critic on Larry Mantle’s FilmWeek, the weekly film review and discussion program that broadcasts from Pasadena-based NPR affiliate KPCC 89.3. Additionally, Tim is a regular commentator on KNBC Los Angeles television, the BBC and other concerns. He is also a producer, screenwriter, editor, and documentarian whose films have been featured in the numerous festivals in the Los Angeles area and elsewhere (Sarasota and Tucson, among others). Check out his audio interviews at: https://soundcloud.com/diggit-2


Author Archives: Tim Cogshell


'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics

Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A […]


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'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics



'Detroit': Marketable Thriller Instead of Real-Life Tragedy

'Still-living history' See previous post: “'Detroit' Movie: Kathryn Bigelow 1967 Riots Depiction 'Horribly Real' & 'Deeply Self-Serving'.” But I'm a Black American from the 1960s, who knows this history as a history of the lives of my people in this nation. From uprisings in Philly and Harlem, to those in Watts and Ferguson (where I lived for years), these stories have been lived and told from generation to generation with the specific intention of keeping me and black boys like me alive. The idea that the police could and did kill black folks anywhere, at anytime, for any reason – or no reason at all – has been a baseline of understanding in black communities for 400 years, give or […]


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'Detroit': Marketable Thriller Instead of Real-Life Tragedy



'Detroit' Movie: Kathryn Bigelow 1967 Riots Depiction 'Horribly Real' & 'Deeply Self-Serving'

Detroit movie street riot scene: The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty director Kathryn Bigelow tackles the 1967 Detroit riots in “horribly real” and “deeply self-serving” 2017 release marketed as a “dramatic thriller.” Kathryn Bigelow's 'Detroit' movie: Horribly real semidocumentary or self-serving Hollywood depiction of 1967 Detroit Rebellion? In the city of Detroit, from July 23 through July 27 of 1967, the people rebelled against the conditions of their existence. Some call this the 1967 Detroit Riot; it's also known as the 12th Street Riot and the 1967 Detroit Rebellion. I prefer the latter. During the rebellion, 43 people died – 33 of whom were black, 10 were white. Twenty-four of the black victims were shot by police officers and […]


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'Detroit' Movie: Kathryn Bigelow 1967 Riots Depiction 'Horribly Real' & 'Deeply Self-Serving'