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Cannes Film Festival Awards: Ken Loach Political Drama Tops

The Wind That Shakes the Barley

13th-Time Lucky: Veteran British filmmaker Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes the Barley, a depiction of the early 20th-century Irish rebellion against British rule, won the Palme d'Or at this year's edition of the Cannes Film Festival. Upon accepting his award, the 69-year-old British filmmaker – the oldest director with a film in competition this year, which happens to be his thirteenth time at Cannes - remarked that he hoped his film was “a little step in the British confronting their imperial history,” adding, “Maybe if we tell the truth about the past, we can tell the truth about the present.” Written by Paul Laverty, The Wind That Shakes the Barley stars Cillian Murphy, Padraic Delaney, and Liam Cunningham.

Flandres

The runner-up was Grand Prix winner Flandres, another war film - in this case about an unnamed modern war that could be seen as an analogy to either Iraq or Afghanistan. Directed by controversial French filmmaker Bruno Dumont, Flandres made some viewers uncomfortable because of its downbeat view of humanity. Dumont had already won the Grand Prix in 1999, when his L'Humanité, which follows the investigation on the rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl in a small French village, created an uproar.

“I think this award really belongs to Pedro. You are the greatest, the greatest. Thank you so much for what you do for women,” remarked Penélope Cruz upon accepting - along with fellow actresses Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Yohana Cobo, Chus Lampreave - the group Best Actress Award for their performances in Pedro Almodóvar's Volver / Return, the story of a ghostmother who tries to make peace with her two living daughters, and probably the favorite film at the festival. As a consolation prize, Almodóvar took home the Best Screenplay Award.

The Best Director was Alejandro González Iñárritu for Babel, a contemporary tale inspired by the biblical fable, and starring Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett, and Gael García Bernal, among others, as Earthlings who, despite all the currently available modern technology, can't find the means to communicate with one another.

Indigenes (2006) directed by Rachid Bouchareb, starring Jamel Debbouze, Samy Nacéri, Roschdy Zem, Sami Bouajila, and Bernard Blancan

The Best Actor Award also went to a group of players: Jamel Debbouze, Samy Nacéri, Roschdy Zem, Sami Bouajila, and Bernard Blancan, the stars of Rachid Bouchareb's Indigènes / Indigenous, another war movie, this one about North African men who'd never set foot in France but who are called to save the Motherland from the Nazi menace.

Red Road (2006) directed by Andrea Arnold, starring Kate Dickie, Tony CurranAmong the other awards were the Jury Prize to Andrea Arnold's thriller Red Road, the story of a surveillance center worker with voyeuristic tendencies; the Camera d'Or for Best First Film to Corneliu Porumboiu's A Fost sau na fost? / 12:08, East of Bucharest, described by The New York Times as “a mordant look back at Romania's 1989 Revolution”; and the Palme d'Or for Best Short Film to Sniffer, by Norwegian director Bobbie Peers.

* Seven of Loach's films were shown in competition in previous years.

Cannes Film Festival Awards 2006

Cannes Film Festival 2006: May 17–28

 

FEATURE FILMS

Ken Loach, director, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, and presenter Emmanuelle Beart

PALME D'OR
THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY by Ken Loach

Bruno Dumont, directed Flandres

GRAND PRIX
FLANDRES by Bruno Dumont

BEST DIRECTOR
Alejandro González Iñárritu for BABEL

Jamel Debbouze, Samy Nacéri, Roschdy Zem, Sami Bouajila, Bernard Blancan in INDIGÈNES

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR
Jamel Debbouze, Samy Nacéri, Roschdy Zem, Sami Bouajila, Bernard Blancan in INDIGÈNES by Rachid Bouchareb

Volver stars Yohana Cobo, Chus Lampreave, Lola Duenas, Penélope Cruz, Carmen Maura, and presenter Jean Rochefort at the Cannes Film Festival

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS
Penélope Cruz, Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Yohana Cobo, Chus Lampreave in VOLVER by Pedro Almodóvar

BEST SCREENPLAY
Pedro Almodóvar for VOLVER

JURY PRIZE
RED ROAD by Andrea Arnold

 

SHORT FILMS

Bobbie Peers, directed Sniffer

PALME D'OR
SNIFFER by Bobbie Peers

JURY PRIZE
PRIMERA NIEVE (Première neige) by Pablo Aguero

HONORABLE MENTION
CONTE DE QUARTIER by Florence Miailhe

 

UN CERTAIN REGARD PRIZE
LUXURY CAR (Voiture de luxe) by Wang Chao

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE
TEN CANOES by Rolf De Heer

ACTING AWARD (ACTOR)
Don Angel Tavira in EL VIOLÍN by Francisco Vargas

ACTING AWARD (ACTRESS)
Doroteea Petre in CUM MI-AM PETRECUT SFÂRSITUL LUMII by Catalin Mitulescu

PRESIDENT OF THE JURY AWARD
MEURTRIÈRES by Patrick Grandperret

CAMÉRA D'OR
A FOST SAU NA FOST? (12:08, East of Bucharest) by Corneliu Porumboiu

 

CINÉFONDATION

FIRST PRIZE
GE & ZETA by Gustavo Riet

SECOND PRIZE
MR. SCHWARTZ, MR. HAZEN & MR. HORLOCKER by Stefan Mueller

THIRD PRIZE (tie)
MOTHER by Siân Heder and A VÍRUS by Ágnes Kocsis

Feature Films Jury: Chinese director Wong Kar Wai, President; Italian actress Monica Bellucci; English actress Helena Bonham Carter; Argentinean director Lucrecia Martel; Chinese actress Ziyi Zhang; American actor Samuel L. Jackson; French director Patrice Leconte; English actor-director Tim Roth; and Palestinian director Elia Suleiman.

Un Certain Regard Jury: Monte Hellman, President; Jean-Pierre Lavoignat; Lars-Olav Beier; Laura Winters; Marjane Satrapi; Maurizio Cabonat

Cinéfondation and short films Jury: Russian director Andreï Konchalovsky, President; French actress Sandrine Bonnaire; German actor Daniel Brühl; Malian director Souleymane Cisse; Polish composer Zbigniew Preisner.


         
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1 Comment to Cannes Film Festival Awards: Ken Loach Political Drama Tops

  1. ohenny

    i'm glad that the wind that shakes the barley won the palm dor.
    it's a good, well made movie, with believable characters and a plot that is still relevant today.
    great work from all involved.