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'Deathly Hallows 2' Shatters 'Eclipse' Box Office Record

Shia LaBeouf, John Turturro, Transformers 3Shia LaBeouf, John Turturro in Michael Bay's Transformers: Dark of the Moon

July 21

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 topped the North American box office on Wednesday, July 20, earning $12.26 million according to Box Office Mojo. Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 passed the $200 million milestone at the domestic box office on Tuesday.

Considering its huge success last weekend – which included $43.5 million from midnight screenings – Deathly Hallows: Part 2 will likely suffer a steep drop this coming weekend. It remains to be seen whether the drop-off rate will be 60 percent, 70 percent, or somewhere in-between. Either way, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 should pass the $300 million milestone early next week. It'll surpass Transformers: Dark of the Moon before the end of the following weekend, thus becoming 2011's biggest domestic blockbuster.

Directed by David Yates, and adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling's novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 also features Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes.

At a surprising no. 2, Horrible Bosses brought in $2.5 million. The R-rated comedy stars Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman, Colin Farrell, and Kevin Spacey.

Down one spot at no. 3, Michael Bay's Transformers 3 collected $2.46 million. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Josh Duhamel, Transformers 3 has pulled in $311.23 million after 22 days. Despite all the studio b.s. about good word-of-mouth helping the latest Transformers close the domestic gap with its predecessor, Dark of the Moon remains $36 million (not adjusted for inflation) behind Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen – which didn't have the advantage of 3D surcharges. Transformers 3 also remains behind the original Transformers in terms of attendance. The first two Transformers movies starred Megan Fox; I wonder if Fox's presence in Transformers 3 would have brought in more patrons.

At no. 4, Kevin James' Zookeeper collected $1.91 million, for a mediocre total of $48.4 million. So much for “family” comedies – Jim Carrey's Mr. Popper's Penguins is already gone from the top twelve chart – invariably performing better than “risque” ones such as Horrible Bosses, Bridesmaids, or Bad Teacher.

Zookeeper was followed by John Lasseter's Cars 2 with $1.26 million at no. 5. Next in line were Disney's Winnie the Pooh with $1.07 million at no. 6 and Cameron Diaz-Justin Timberlake-Jason Segel's Bad Teacher with $784,000 at no. 7. One more slight drop and Winnie the Pooh will fall below the $1m-per-day mark.

At no. 8, the Tom Hanks-Julia Roberts vehicle Larry Crowne, directed by Hanks himself, added $399,000.

Rounding out the top twelve were Woody Allen-Owen Wilson's Midnight in Paris with $296,000, Kristen Wiig's Bridesmaids with $291,000, J.J. Abrams' Super 8 with $285,000, Selena Gomez's Monte Carlo with $280k.

Among the top-twelve movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scored the highest per-theater average, a 3D/IMAX-assisted $2,804. Larry Crowne had the lowest, $175.

Also among the top twelve, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 had the steepest Tuesday-to-Wednesday drop-off rate, down 20 percent. Midnight in Paris had the lowest, the aforementioned down 4 percent.

Photo: Midnight in Paris (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics)

July 18

Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 dominated the North American box office this past July 15-17 weekend, earning a record-breaking (if you choose to ignore inflation) $169.18 million, according to box office actuals found at Box Office Mojo. Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scored a – 3D surcharge-boosted – $38,672 per-theater average at 4,375 locations.

Internationally, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 is officially the record-breaking release ever in US dollar terms, having pulled in a whopping $312.3 million in 59 territories after five days.

Now, whenever you read about international opening-weekend records, it's always good to remember a few things:

  • inflation is a reality around the world
  • 3D will inflate ticket prices by up to 40 percent, whether you're tallying box office receipts in San Francisco, Santiago, Stockholm, Seoul, or Sydney
  • currency fluctuations can (and do) radically alter box office earnings when converted to US dollars (see international Titanic vs. Avatar box office comparison)
  • some movies open in 10 territories, others in 20 or 30 or, in the case of the latest Harry Potter movie, 59. The only major film market missing from the Harry Potter international release is China, where it opens in August.

Deathly Hallows: Part 2's worldwide tally after five days: $481.48 million. Will it become the very first Harry Potter movie to break the US$ 1 billion barrier because the Harry Potter fan base has become bigger, as studio executives are claiming? Only if you choose to ignore inflation. Else, several other Harry Potter movies have already earned that much (in 2011 US dollars). What's more, the very first Harry Potter – the Chris Columbus-directed Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone – will likely remain the most popular Harry Potter at the domestic (and possibly worldwide) box office in terms of ticket sales.

Directed by David Yates, and adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling's novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 features Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes.

Photo: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (Jaap Buitendijk / Warner Bros.)

Previous post (July 14)

Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 collected an estimated $43.6 million in 26 territories on Wednesday. In large part thanks to revenue-boosting 3D ticket prices – which represented nearly two-thirds of the film's gross – Deathly Hallows: Part 2 is up 82 percent compared to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and 49 percent ahead of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, according to Ray Subers at Box Office Mojo.

In terms of gross – but not necessarily ticket sales and not adjusted for inflation/currency fluctuations – Deathly Hallows: Part 2 broke opening-day records in Australia ($7.5 million), Italy ($4.6 million), and throughout much of Northern Europe, including Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, and Denmark. Additionally, it boasted the Wednesday opening record in France ($7.1 million), the preview record in Germany ($5.3 million), and the Warner Bros. opening day record in Russia ($4.1 million).

By Friday, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 will have opened in 59 international territories, including all major ones with the exception of China, where it opens August 4. Once again in US dollars not adjusted for inflation/currency fluctuations, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is the biggest Harry Potter movie overseas, with earnings of $660 million.

Currently, another 3D entry, the Johnny Depp-Penélope Cruz vehicle Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, holds the record for biggest (unadjusted) international opening ever: $260.4 million last May. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince holds the record for biggest worldwide (including the US and Canada) opening, $394 million.

Deathly Hallows: Part 2 opens at midnight Friday in North America. Approximately $25 million in tickets have already been sold. It's possible that the last Harry Potter will break the $30 million record set by the Robert Pattinson-Kristen Stewart-Taylor Lautner vehicle The Twilight Saga: Eclipse last summer.

Also in the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 cast: Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes. David Yates directed.

Photo: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (Jaap Buitendijk / Warner Bros.)

July 19 Update

Owen Wilson, Midnight in Paris
Owen Wilson in Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 topped the North American box office on Monday, July 18, earning $18.04 million according to Box Office Mojo. Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 will likely pass the $200 million milestone at the domestic box office some time today.

Directed by David Yates, and adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling's novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 also features Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes.

At no. 2, Michael Bay's Transformers: Dark of the Moon collected $2.83 million. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Josh Duhamel, Transformers 3 is currently the biggest 2011 domestic release. Within three weeks or so, that may change as Deathly Hallows: Part 2 seems poised to become the year's biggest blockbuster.

Starring Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman, Colin Farrell, and Kevin Spacey, Horrible Bosses brought in $2.61 million at no. 3. The R-rated comedy was followed by Kevin James' Zookeeper with $1.84 million at no. 4. At no. 5, John Lasseter's Cars 2 drew $1.23 million.

Next in line were Disney's Winnie the Pooh with $1.12 million at no. 6 and the Cameron Diaz-Justin Timberlake-Jason Segel R-rated comedy Bad Teacher with $785,000 at no. 7.

At no. 8, the Tom Hanks-Julia Roberts vehicle Larry Crowne, directed by Tom Hanks himself, added $343,000.

Rounding out the top twelve were J.J. Abrams' Super 8 with $280,000, Selena Gomez's Monte Carlo with $267,000, Woody Allen-Owen Wilson's Midnight in Paris with $262,000, Kristen Wiig's Bridesmaids with $261,000. Monte Carlo was back among the top twelve following a surprisingly low 30 percent Sunday-to-Monday drop-off rate.

Gone from the top twelve was Jim Carrey's Mr. Popper's Penguins.

Among the top-twelve movies on the North American chart, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scored the highest per-theater average, a 3D/IMAX-assisted $4,124. Larry Crowne had the lowest, $150.

Also among the top twelve, Transformers: Dark of the Moon had the steepest Sunday-to-Monday drop-off rate, down 56 percent. Monte Carlo had the lowest, the aforementioned down 30 percent.

Photo: Midnight in Paris (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics)

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Transformers: Dark of the Moon
Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Transformers: Dark of the Moon

At no. 2 in the U.S. and Canada, Michael Bay's Transformers: Dark of the Moon collected $21.32 million, down a hefty 55 percent from last weekend according to box office actuals found at Box Office Mojo. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Josh Duhamel, this past weekend Transformers 3 became the first 2011 release to pass the $300 million milestone at the domestic box office. Total to date: $302.87 million. Worldwide: $762.31 million. Cost: $195 million.

Down a relatively modest 37 percent – thus holding up better than fellow R-rated comedy Bad TeacherHorrible Bosses brought in $17.77 million. Greeted by wildly mixed reviews [correction: it wasn't exactly “poorly received”], Horrible Bosses stars Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman, Colin Farrell, and Kevin Spacey. Domestic total: $60.14 million. Cost: $35 million.

Kevin James' “family” comedy Zookeeper – though down only 38 percent – has thus far fared considerably worse than the R-rated Horrible Bosses, taking in $12.33 million on its second weekend out. Sony Pictures has a sizable flop in its hands. Domestic total: $42.38 million. Worldwide: $49.88 million. Cost: $80 million.

At no. 5, John Lasseter's Cars 2 drew $8.4 million. Domestic total: $165.38 million. Worldwide: $286.98 million. Cost: $200 million.

The Disney/Pixar animated feature was followed by Disney newcomer Winnie the Pooh, opening at no. 6 with a mere $7.85 million at 2,405 venues, averaging $3,267 per site. Cost: $30 million.

At no. 7, the Cameron Diaz-Justin Timberlake-Jason Segel R-rated comedy Bad Teacher scored $5.15 million (down 42 percent). Domestic total: $88.45 million. Worldwide: $134.15 million. Cost: $20 million. In sum: Sony Pictures has a sizable hit in its hands.

Photo: Transformers: Dark of the Moon (Mark Fellman / Paramount Pictures)

Owen Wilson, Midnight in Paris, Woody Allen
Owen Wilson in Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris

At no. 8, the Tom Hanks-Julia Roberts vehicle Larry Crowne, directed by Tom Hanks himself, bagged a mere $2.66 million on weekend no. 3, down 55 percent according to box office actuals found at Box Office Mojo. Larry Crowne will be gone from the top-twelve chart very soon.

Larry Crowne's domestic total: $31.71 million. Worldwide: $40.11 million. Cost: $30 million. Remember, studios get only about 50-55 percent of a movie's domestic grosses, and about 45 percent of international grosses.

Rounding out the top twelve were J.J. Abrams' Super 8 with $1.97 million (down 59 percent), Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris with $1.87 million (down 28 percent), Kristen Wiig's Bridesmaids with $1.72 million (down 34 percent), and Jim Carrey's Mr. Popper's Penguins with $1.36 million (down 57 percent).

Featuring Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard, Rachel McAdams, Michael Sheen, and Kathy Bates, Midnight in Paris is now officially Woody Allen's highest-grossing movie at the North American box office. Total to date: $41.77 million. Never mind the fact that the film Midnight in Paris has supposedly surpassed, Hannah and Her Sisters, came out in 1986, when movie ticket prices were considerably lower. In fact, in terms of ticket sales, Hannah and Her Sisters sold approximately twice as many movie tickets as Midnight in Paris. (Admittedly, with some help from an Oscar-season rerelease in early 1987.)

In terms of attendance, Annie Hall and Manhattan remain by far Woody Allen's biggest box office hits in North America. Overseas, Midnight in Paris has collected $33.5 million, for a worldwide grand total of $75.27 million. All in all, a remarkably successful Woody Allen effort, especially for our much-changed movie-distribution era.

And finally, the shocking news about the North American box office chart is that Ryan Reynolds' Green Lantern earned less money at the box office than Mr. Poppin's Penguins. At 973 locations, Green Lantern drew $1.35 million at no. 13, for a domestic total of $112.78 million. Worldwide: $146.08 million. Cost: $200 million.

Among the top-twelve movies on the North American chart, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scored the highest per-theater average, a 3D/IMAX surcharge-assisted $38,672. Larry Crowne had the lowest, $1,165.

Also among the top twelve (barring newcomers Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 and Winnie the Pooh), Super 8 suffered the steepest drop-off rate, down 59 percent, after losing 833 theaters. Midnight in Paris had the lowest, down 29 percent, despite the loss of 113 locations.

Photo: Midnight in Paris (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics)

July 16

If you blithely choose to ignore ticket-price hikes, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 now has the highest-grossing opening weekend ever in North America, having just surpassed Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight. According to studio estimates found at Box Office Mojo, Deathly Hallows: Part 2, which stars Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, collected $168.55 million – including $43.5 million from midnight screenings – at 4,375 locations this July 15-17 weekend, or nearly $10 million more than The Dark Knight's $158.4 million three years ago. If inflation didn't exist, it would have to be invented so studios and the media could continue heralding one record-breaking phenomenon after another.

In terms of attendance, The Dark Knight remains way ahead of Deathly Hallows: Part 2. Not only its gross would be approximately $173 million in 2011 dollars, but the Batman Begins sequel starring Christian Bale and Heath Ledger was distributed in the standard 2D format. About 43 percent of Deathly Hallows: Part 2's box office revenues originated from 3D venues. Those can cost up to 40 percent more than regular movie houses.

Even though its 3D ratio was considerably smaller than that of Michael Bay's Transformers: Dark of the Moon's 60 percent, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 collected an estimated $72.5 million from 3D screenings, including a record-breaking $15.5 million from IMAX locations. Only Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland boasted higher 3D earnings on its first weekend, $81.3 million.

So, without the 3D revenue boost (estimating a modest 25 percent ticket-price increase average), Deathly Hallows: Part 2 would have earned about $154 million in ticket sales – or nearly $20 million less than The Dark Knight's inflation-adjusted $173 million. And never mind the fact that The Dark Knight opened at 94 (pricier) IMAX locations, versus Deathly Hallows: Part 2's 274 locations.

Admittedly, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 has clearly outperformed Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, which drew $125 million on its first weekend out in November 2010. Thanks to inflated ticket prices and the 3D revenue-boosting effect, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 will likely become the highest-grossing Harry Potter movie ever in North America, though it'll in all likelihood trail Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone – the very first Harry Potter movie – in terms of attendance. In that regard, Deathly Hallows: Part 2 may end up behind even Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix as well.

Here are a couple more first-weekend comparisons: Sam Raimi-Tobey Maguire's Spider-Man 3 earned $151.1 million in 2007 (approx. $168 million in 2011), Robert Pattinson-Kristen Stewart-Taylor Lautner's The Twilight Saga: New Moon earned $142.8 million in 2009 (approx. $149.5 million in 2011), Gore Verbinski-Johnny Depp's Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest earned $135.6 million in 2006 (approx. $163 million in 2011).

At the domestic box office, the Harry Potter movies are about the surpass the cumulative (unadjusted) gross of the Star Wars movies: $2.177b vs. $2.218b. Needless to say, in terms of attendance the Star Wars movies remain very much ahead. Box Office Mojo estimates that the total take of the Harry Potter franchise represents 57 percent of the total take of the Star Wars franchise.

Directed by David Yates, and adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling's novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 also features Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes.

Previous post

Daniel Radcliffe, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2
Daniel Radcliffe, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 scored the highest-grossing single-day ever at the North American box office according to Box Office Mojo, collecting an estimated $92.1 million – including about $43.5 million from midnight screenings – at 4,375 locations on Friday, thus far surpassing the $72.7 million earned by the Kristen Stewart-Robert Pattinson-Taylor Lautner combo The Twilight Saga: New Moon. Directed by David Yates, the final installment in the Harry Potter movie franchise stars Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes.

Now, if we're discussing ticket sales instead of grosses – which can be easily inflated thanks to ticket-price hikes, 3D/IMAX surcharges – the gap separating Deathly Hallows: Part 2 from New Moon was considerably smaller.

First of all, bear in mind that New Moon's inflation-adjusted grosses would lift it to approximately $76 million in 2011 dollars. Deathly Hallows: Part 2, for its part, boasted the widest 3D release ever, at more than 3,100 theaters, including 274 IMAX sites. About 45 percent of the Harry Potter movie's box office take originated from 3D venues. (Down from Transformers: Dark of the Moon's 60 percent ratio.) Those theaters can charge up to 40 percent more than standard movie “2D” houses.

Also, excepting Deathly Hallows: Part 2's record-breaking midnight grosses, the latest Harry Potter movie was behind Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight on Day 1, and earned as much as The Twilight Saga: New Moon if adjusted for inflation. That means 3D-less New Moon was way ahead in terms of estimated attendance.

Compared to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, the sequel is undeniably way ahead at this stage. Deathly Hallows: Part 1 pulled in $61.7 million (including midnight grosses) in fall 2010.

If Deathly Hallows: Part 2 follows the pattern of its predecessor, it will earn around $180-185 million by Sunday evening, easily shattering The Dark Knight's opening-weekend box office record. (Though The Dark Knight should remain ahead in terms of attendance.)

Also in the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 cast: Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Gary Oldman, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes.

Photo: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (Jaap Buitendijk / Warner Bros.)

July 15

Ralph Fiennes, Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Ralph Fiennes, Daniel Radcliffe, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

Directed by David Yates, and starring Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, and Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 smashed the domestic midnight opening record on Friday, collecting an estimated $43.5 million at 3,800 locations, according to Box Office Mojo. The previous midnight record holder was the Kristen Stewart-Robert Pattinson-Taylor Lautner movie The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, which opened with $30 million at about 4,000 locations in late June 2010. David Slade directed Eclipse.

For comparison's sake: The Twilight Saga: New Moon pulled in $26.3 million at midnight screenings, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 earned $24 million, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince $22.2 million, The Dark Knight $18.5 million, and 2011's previous record-holder, The Hangover Part II, $10.4 million. I'm assuming the suits at Warner Bros. are now lamenting that they didn't split Deathly Hallows into twenty instead of just two movies.

Deathly Hallows: Part 2 record-breaking midnight opening was assisted by 3D surcharges. Even so, the last installment in the Harry Potter franchise also sold more tickets than Eclipse – though, obviously, the margin was considerably smaller in that regard as 3D surcharges can increase ticket prices by up to 40 percent.

Box Office Mojo has been predicting a $145 million opening weekend for Deathly Hallows: Part 2. “Anything less … would be a bit disappointing,” adds Brandon Gray.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 opened with $125 million in November 2010. That represented 42 percent of the film's total gross. Previous Harry Potter movies collected between 26-37 percent of their total take on their first weekend out.

At the domestic box office, apart from Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the Harry Potter movies have been selling increasingly fewer tickets since Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone opened in November 2001. Overseas, where the Harry Potter movies make about two-thirds of their revenues, attendance has remained relatively constant.

Now, will Stewart-Pattinson-Lautner's The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 smash Deathly Hallows: Part 2's box office record later this year? Summit Entertainment surely hopes so. Stay tuned.

Also in the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 cast: Gary Oldman, Helena Bonham Carter, Jason Isaacs, Emma Thompson, Tom Felton, Michael Gambon, John Hurt, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Kelly Macdonald, Ciaran Hinds, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall, Miranda Richardson, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Warwick Davis, and Miriam Margolyes. Steve Kloves adapted J.K. Rowling's novel.

Photo: Warner Bros.


         
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1 Comment to 'Deathly Hallows 2' Shatters 'Eclipse' Box Office Record

  1. lola

    LOL smashes … they have 3D and that brings more money… I have see Potter, boring movie