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Doris Day: Rock Hudson & People with AIDS Remembered + Charlie Hunnam 'Male Bonding Energy'

Doris Day photosDoris Day has sent a letter thanking the nearly 3,000 participants of AIDS/Lifecycle 11. Day's on-screen romantic partner and off-screen friend Rock Hudson died of AIDS-related complications in 1985. In reference to Hudson, Day wrote the following:

“I know many of you there have also experienced a similar loss to mine. What you're doing is so important, both to remember those gone and also to ensure those alive keep living much longer than Rock was able to.

“So keep peddling. May the winds carry you all the way to L.A., your last leg. And on those tough hills, remember one of my favorite phrases, 'Que sera sera, whatever will be, will be. The future is not ours to see.'

“But I know that future will be brighter because of all of you.”

Last December, Doris Day was interviewed (via email) by the gay-oriented magazine The Advocate. Day remembered Rock Hudson as “a wonderful actor and one of the funniest men I have ever known, so you can imagine how much fun I had working with him.”

The Rock Hudson / Doris Day movies consisted of (only) three romantic comedies: Michael Gordon's Pillow Talk (1959), which earned Day her only Best Actress Academy Award nomination; Delbert Mann's Lover Come Back (1961); and Norman Jewison's Send Me No Flowers (1964).

Doris Day movies

Among Doris Day's other movies are David Butler's Lullaby of Broadway (1951), with Gene Nelson; Gordon Douglas' Young at Heart (1954), with Frank Sinatra; Charles Vidor's Love Me or Leave Me (1955), with James Cagney; Alfred Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), with James Stewart; Gene Kelly's The Tunnel of Love (1958), with Richard Widmark; Delbert Mann's That Touch of Mink (1962), with Cary Grant; and Michael Gordon's Move Over Darling (1963), with James Garner and Polly Bergen. (The last title, a remake of Garson Kanin's My Favorite Wife, was to have been the Marilyn Monroe vehicle Something's Got to Give, which Fox canceled during filming.)

Doris Day retired from the screen after Howard Morris' remarried-with-children comedy With Six You Get Eggroll, released in 1969, and co-starring Brian Keith. An album, “My Heart,” was released in Sept. 2011. Day turned 88 last April 3. She lives in the Carmel area, in Northern California.

When asked what she missed about her Hollywood days, Doris Day told The Advocate: “Working with such terrific actors and actresses … having such a great time. It wasn't 'work' to me … I couldn't wait to get to the studio in the morning … I enjoyed every minute of it.”

In David Butler's 1953 musical Western Calamity Jane, a butched-up Doris Day sings the Oscar-winning song “Secret Love.” Written by Sammy Fain and Paul Francis Webster, the song has become a sort of gay anthem. When asked how she felt about “having a song that's taken on such meaning for marginalized people,” Day responded: “I was not aware of that, but that's wonderful.”

Make sure to check out The Doris Day Animal League and Animal Foundation.

Pacific Rim Idris Elba
Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim movie image: Idris Elba

'Pacific Rim' Movie: Charlie Hunnam Male Bonding Energy

Prometheus' Idris Elba will soon be Pacific Rim's Idris Elba. Two movies beginning with a “p” and featuring nasty aliens set on destroying the human race. This is one thing I never get about alien invasion movies: with human beings intent on destroying themselves or looking the other way as their world goes to rot, why would aliens take the time to destroy us? They just have to wait a few decades (or less) and the job will be done for them.

Well, let's go for something more philosophically challenging: Guillermo del Toro's affirmation that Pacific Rim star Charlie Hunnam, 32, is “the right side of honest and good looking that you don't want to punch him in the face. You want to have a pint with the guy. You want to take him to the pub. There's male bonding energy with this guy that I thought was perfect for the character.”

Del Toro's bit of folk wisdom is to be found in Total Film. And the Pacific Rim director does have a point. Charlie Hunnam, after all, did a lot of male bonding in Queer As Folk, including (at least) one scene of profoundly energetic man-on-man connection. In that television series, guys were falling all over themselves to spend time with Hunnam at the, huh, pub.

By the way, this is no Charlie Hunnam putdown. Just the usual “male bonding energy” p.r. bullshit putdown. Considering most people's mix of bigotry, prudishness, and viciousness, what Hunnam did in Queer As Folk, while he was still a teenager, was very, very brave. Much braver, in fact, than fighting monsters in something like Pacific Rim.

And back to Pacific Rim we go.

Pacific Rim: Destruction on an epic scale

So, Prometheus – there's that Ridley Scott movie again – killed Guillermo del Toro's passion project At the Mountains of Madness. Del Toro also missed out on The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and its expected follow-up. But the director of Hellboy II: The Golden Army and Pan's Labyrinth says he has had a ball making Pacific Rim.

As per del Toro, whole city blocks were built to pass for Hong Kong. Then the director had all those structures destroyed. If del Toro isn't exaggerating, Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight Rises will not be the only (or last) talkie to boast moviemaking on a par with the Ramon Novarro Ben-Hur or D.W. Griffith's Intolerance or first Best Production Academy Award winner Wings. In case you didn't know, Nolan claimed that his upcoming Batman movie is an epic on a scale unseen since the silent era. (Poor megalomaniac epicmeister Cecil B. DeMille must be turning in his grave.)

In addition to Charlie Hunnam and Idris Elba, Pacific Rim features Babel's Rinko Kikuchi (who also has a remake of 47 Ronin coming out next year), Horrible Bosses' Charlie Day, Siren's Robert Kazinsky, Capote's Clifton Collins Jr., Max Martini, and del Toro muse Ron Perlman.

Rising from the depths of the ocean (at the command of an alien force?), the evil monsters in the film are called Kaiju, which makes Pacific Rim sound like an homage to Godzilla and other Japanese monster flicks of the '50s and '60s. Clash of the Titans' Travis Beacham wrote the screenplay.

Warner Bros., the same company that'll be releasing The Dark Knight Rises on July 20, will launch Pacific Rim on July 12, 2013.

Pacific Rim / Idris Elba picture: Warner Bros.


         
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4 Comments to Doris Day: Rock Hudson & People with AIDS Remembered + Charlie Hunnam 'Male Bonding Energy'

  1. Toby Martin

    Such a touching letter to the cyclists on behalf of her friend Rock Hudson. A gracious woman indeed. Always loved her films and music. Yet another reason to love her!

  2. Ana

    LOVE DORIS DAY!

  3. HN

    Doris Day is a screen legend like no other.
    I miss Rock Hudson, too.
    I wish he were still with us.

  4. Thea M.

    Thank you, Doris Day, for such a beautiful letter.