Joan Collins Quotes + Lauren Bacall vs. 'Movie Legend' Nicole Kidman & Greek Attorneys vs. Gay Alexander the Great

Joan Collins Dynasty: Quotes for 50 years latest on Nicole Kidman movie legend statusJoan Collins in Dynasty. Joan Collins quotes have been media fodder for decades, as the British actress has been around since the early 1950s. Half a century after Decameron Nights, The Slasher, and Our Girl Friday, Collins continues to be quoted, this time after weighing in on the multifaceted controversy surrounding Nicole Kidman's movie legend status.

Lauren Bacall & Joan Collins quotes + a question for the ages: Is Nicole Kidman a movie legend?

Joan Collins (The Stud, The Bitch, the TV series Dynasty) recently discussed Best Actress Oscar winner Nicole Kidman (The Hours, 2002), whose alleged legendary status gave revered Hollywood legend Lauren Bacall (To Have and Have Not, How to Marry a Millionaire, The Fan) the heebie-jeebies at the 2004 Venice Film Festival last September.

Here's the Joan Collins quote via femalefirst.co.uk (where the quotation marks seem to have been misplaced).

“To be a legend you're usually dead or exceedingly old. The legends are Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn – there are so many. As for the furore over whether Nicole Kidman is a legend. I don't think she's old enough or dead enough.”

The lively debate about Nicole Kidman's movie legend status began after a “journalist” asked Lauren Bacall what it was like to be a Screen Legend working with another Screen Legend (Kidman) in Jonathan Glazer's psychological drama Birth, in which Bacall plays Kidman's mother.

The Howard Hawks discovery and Humphrey Bogart widow replied:

“She's not a legend. She's a beginner [Nicole Kidman has been in movies for more than two decades*]. What is this 'legend'? She can't be a legend at whatever age she is. She can't be a legend, you have to be older.”

Now, whether or not an Certified Film Legend, Nicole Kidman, for her part, has the following to say (via The Early Show) about her unexpected stardom:

“I just can't believe that I'm even in a position to be making movies, to be honest. There's times when I go, 'I can't believe somebody wants me to be in their movie.' So, whatever power I have (in the business) at the moment, I want to give to the directors that I believe in.”

Nicole Kidman movies

* Legend or No Legend, Nicole Kidman's film career began more than two decades ago. Her first movies, the Australian dramas Bush Christmas and BMX Bandits, were released in 1983.

Since that time, Kidman has been seen in about 30 features, among them:

Lauren Bacall Nicole Kidman Birth Danny Houston: Woman obsessed with boy film booedLauren Bacall, Nicole Kidman, and Danny Houston in Birth. Booed at a press screening at the Venice Film Festival, Birth revolves around a touchy subject matter: a grown woman (Nicole Kidman) becomes obsessed with a ten-year-old boy (Cameron Bright), whom she believes to be her reincarnated husband. Movie legend Lauren Bacall plays (future movie legend?) Nicole Kidman's mother.

Lauren Bacall explains herself

Spring 2005 update: Lauren Bacall's comments at the 2004 Venice Film Festival were perceived as an impolite dismissal of Nicole Kidman's career. According to Bacall, that had not been her intention.

As found in an April 2005 issue of The Guardian, Bacall explained herself to interviewer Susie Mackenzie:

“What I meant was that her career is just beginning [sic]. She is wonderfully talented, a working actress. I hate these labels, I hate categories. Why do they have to burden her with all that? … Legends are all to do with the past and nothing to do with the present.”

Bacall then added that Humphrey Bogart, who died of cancer in 1957, is “more of a legend now than ever. And he has been dead almost 50 years.”

Also, if you want to become “a legend in your own lifetime,” you'd better do like Greta Garbo and disappear from view. (Although that didn't quite work out for Garbo's fellow MGM star Norma Shearer.)

Alexander the Great Gay? Colin Farrell + Jared Leto movie infuriates Greek attorneysAlexander the Great gay? Colin Farrell as Alexander the Great and Jared Leto as Hephaistion in Alexander. Oliver Stone's $150 million-budget historical epic Alexander traces the life and battles of the megalomaniac Macedonian conqueror, including – according to reports – a portrait of his intimate relationship with right-hand man Hephaistion.

Was Alexander the Great gay?

Perhaps one day the world will find out whether Nicole Kidman has reached movie legend status. At that time there will surely be more Joan Collins quotes referring to Kidman's ascension to the pantheon.

But will we ever know whether or not Alexander the Great was gay?

To the best of our knowledge, there are no Joan Collins quotes on the matter, but a group of Greek attorneys have been quite vocal about Oliver Stone's portrayal of their national hero in his upcoming $150 million-budget epic Alexander, starring a weirdly blond Colin Farrell.

Many Greeks, it seems, abhor the very thought that the megalomaniac Macedonian warrior was sexually attracted to men. After all, surely he must have been 100 percent heterosexual; else, how could he have conquered anything?

Yet Stone's Alexander reportedly portrays Alexander the Great as bisexual. Angelina Jolie and Val Kilmer play his parents (of, thus far, unclear sexual orientation).

Here's a quote by the reported leader of said group of outraged Greek attorneys, pitting the real-life Alexander the Great against Oliver Stone's Alexander the movie:

“We are not saying that we are against gays, but we are saying that the production company should make it clear to the audience that this film is pure fiction and not a true depiction of the life of Alexander. … We have not seen the film[,] but from the information we have … there are references to his alleged homosexuality, a fact that is in no historical document or archive on Alexander. Either they make it clear that this is a work of fiction or we will take the case further.”

Who the hell knows?

Despite what the Greek attorneys claim, historians aren't sure themselves whether or not Alexander the Great was gay or bisexual or what. Some, in fact, believe that Alexander and his right-hand man, Hephaistion (Jared Leto in Oliver Stone's film), were indeed lovers. For obvious reasons, there's no conclusive evidence either way.

Something else: Unlike many (most?) modern Greeks (and others elsewhere) and long before the publication of Alfred Kinsey's revolutionary book Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, many ancient Greek cultures (there wasn't just one) saw homoeroticism as perfectly natural.

And really, can anyone “take the case further” when the case in question relates to the sexual orientation of someone who lived nearly 2,500 years ago?

Let's ask Joan Collins and get a few quotes.

See also: Alexander the Great movie: Gay, Bisexual or Befuddled?

Greek attorney's quote via the Sydney Morning Herald.

Alfred Kinsey life-changer

Speaking of Sexual Behavior in the Human Male author Alfred Kinsey, here's Kinsey director Bill Condon – who's openly gay – referring to the subject of his latest film at a fundraising event in the American Midwest (more specifically, Indiana):

“I know my life is radically different because of him.”

And here is another Kinsey-related quote, this one by Paul Gebhard, 87, a former member of Alfred Kinsey's research team.

In Bill Condon's film, Gebhard is portrayed by Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Timothy Hutton (Ordinary People, 1980).

“For artistic reasons, they took some liberties with facts, but basically, it's an excellent film.”

To date, no one has been demanding that Bill Condon make it clear that Kinsey is purely a work of fiction so as to prevent potential plaintiffs from taking their case further. But when the movie comes out, expect at least some controversy all the same.

Kinsey Chris O'Donnell Timothy Hutton Liam Neeson Peter Sarsgaard. Life-changing sex researcherKinsey with Chris O'Donnell, Timothy Hutton, Peter Sarsgaard, and Liam Neeson as the revolutionary, controversial, and “life-changing” sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, author of Sexual Behavior in the Human Male. Kinsey was directed by openly gay filmmaker Bill Condon, the writer-director of the successful indie Gods and Monsters, about another real-life figure, gay Hollywood director James Whale (Frankenstein, Show Boat).

'Kinsey' cast

Kinsey stars Liam Neeson as the revolutionary and still controversial sex researcher and Laura Linney as his wife.

Peter Sarsgaard plays Kinsey's assistant Clyde Martin, with whom the researcher – according to the film – has an affair.

Also in the cast:

Chris O'Donnell. Tim Curry. Oliver Platt. Dylan Baker. John Lithgow. William Sadler. Veronica Cartwright. Julianne Nicholson. Dagmara Dominczyk.

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner actress Katharine Houghton (who also happens to be Katharine Hepburn's niece).

Bill Condon quote via The Associated Press. Paul Gebhard quote also via The Associated Press.

A silver lining following George W. Bush's reelection

In other quotable news, following the reelection of U.S. President George W. Bush, Michael Moore tells the world at large – and the millions of Americans who didn't vote for the right-wing Republican – to look for the silver lining.

“The official mourning period is over today and there is a silver lining – George W. Bush is prohibited by law from running again.”

Michael Moore, by the way, will reportedly be directing a follow-up to his anti-Bush documentary Fahrenheit 9/11.

Michael Moore quote via eonline.com.

'National disgrace'

“A national disgrace.”

That's what Stephen Holden nearly calls not the reelection of George W. Bush – but Jon Turteltaub's National Treasure. In his New York Times review of Nicolas Cage's latest braindead blockbuster-in-the-making, Holden wails:

“If National Treasure mattered at all, you might call it a national disgrace, but this piece of flotsam is so inconsequential that it amounts to little more than a piece of Hollywood accounting.”

Others featured in this latest piece of Hollywood accounting are:

Diane Kruger. Justin Bartha. Sean Bean. Oleg Taktarov. Mark Pellegrino.

Best Actor Oscar winner Jon Voight (Coming Home, 1978).

The Sound of Music actor Christopher Plummer.

Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee Harvey Keitel (Bugsy, 1991).

David O. Russell DNA

And finally, here's director David O. Russell (Flirting with Disaster, Spanking the Monkey) talking about his latest release, the psychosocioanalytical comedy I Heart Huckabees:

“This film comes out of my own DNA. I actually started working on it back in the 1980s, while I was living in New York City.”

Among the cast members found in this cinematic extension of Russell's genetic make-up are:

Isabelle Huppert. Naomi Watts. Dustin Hoffman. Jude Law. Mark Wahlberg. Lily Tomlin. Jason Schwartzman.

And in brief roles:

Two-time Oscar nominee Talia Shire (as Best Supporting Actress for The Godfather: Part II, 1974; as Best Actress for Rocky, 1976).

Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds & Marnie veteran Tippi Hedren.

See also: Despite Warner Bros.' cold feet, David O. Russell's Iraq War movie gets distribution.

David O. Russell quote via The Guardian.

 

Image of quote-friendly Joan Collins in Dynasty: CBS Television Distribution.

Danny Houston, Lauren Bacall, and Nicole Kidman Birth image: New Line Cinema.

Image of Jared Leto and Colin Farrell as a possibly gay Alexander the Great in Oliver Stone's Alexander: Warner Bros.

Liam Neeson, Peter Sarsgaard, Chris O'Donnell, and Timothy Hutton Kinsey image: Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Joan Collins Quotes + Lauren Bacall vs. 'Movie Legend' Nicole Kidman & Greek Attorneys vs. Gay Alexander the Great © 2004–2018 Alt Film Guide and/or author(s).
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