***We're looking for contributors***

         

Film Critics Awards: Mormon Missionary Sex Slave Documentary Unexpected Win

Tabloid Joyce McKinney: Errol Morris The Case of the Manacled Mormon missionary sex slave film critics' surprise winTabloid with Joyce McKinney. The Detroit Film Critics Society's surprising Best Documentary of 2011, Errol Morris' Tabloid, offers a glimpse into “The Case of the Manacled Mormon” a.k.a. “The Mormon Sex in Chains Case.” After going missing for a few days in Ewell, Surrey, in 1977, American Mormon missionary Kirk Anderson claimed he had been abducted from the steps of a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints meetinghouse and driven to a cottage in Devon, where he was chained to a bed and eventually raped by former Miss Wyoming World Joyce McKinney. McKinney, who denied the charges, and reported co-conspirator Keith May were arrested, but jumped bail and fled to the United States. No extradition proceedings took place, so that the former Miss Wyoming was sentenced to one year in prison in absentia. Long before the Internet, the British yellow press and their voracious readers enjoyed collective orgasms that lasted months. Like most culturally significant folk tales, the Mormon missionary sex slave story was turned into song: Radio Stars' “(I Got Dem Old) Sex in Chains Blues,” written by band member Martin Gordon, and included on their 1979 Holiday Album.

Expected 'The Artist' & unexpected 'Tabloid' top Detroit Film Critics Awards: The demise of silent movies + 'The Mormon Sex in Chains Case'

The Detroit Film Critics Society has chosen Michel Hazanavicius' Old Hollywood homage The Artist as their top film of 2011. (See further below the full list of Detroit Film Critics winners.)

No matter how well-deserved The Artist's win (more on that below), the Detroit Film Critics' most interesting pick was an unexpected one: Errol Morris' documentary Tabloid, which to date has won only one other award from a U.S.-based critics' group, courtesy of the San Francisco Film Critics Circle.

In Tabloid, the director of The Thin Blue Line, A Brief History of Time, and the Oscar-winning The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara tackles the curious tale of 1973 Miss Wyoming World Joyce McKinney, who, much to the delight of the British yellow press and their readers, was accused of kidnapping American Mormon missionary Kirk Anderson, who disappeared for a few days while in Surrey in September 1977, and turning him into her own private sex slave in what became known in certain circles as “The Case of the Manacled Mormon” a.k.a. “The Mormon Sex in Chains Case.”

Curiously, the Mormon missionary sex slave drama has continued into the early 21st century. Last month, McKinney filed a lawsuit with the Los Angeles Superior Court, claiming that she had been tricked into appearing in Tabloid, and that Errol Morris and producer Mark Lipson had defamed her in the documentary, portraying her as “crazy, a sex offender, an S&M prostitute, and/or a rapist.”

'A Star Is Born' meets 'Singin' in the Rain'

For better or for worse, there's no S&M sex in The Artist, an old-fashioned tale set in Hollywood at the dawn of the sound era, and featuring elements from, among others, A Star Is Born and Singin' in the Rain. In the black-and-white, mostly silent French-Belgian co-production, Cannes Film Festival Best Actor winner Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo play movie stars following different upward/downward paths – he's moving down; she's moving up.

In addition to its Best Film win, The Artist earned Michel Hazanavicius the Detroit Film Critics' Best Director citation. The Best Screenplay award, however, went to Aaron Sorkin and Steven Zaillian for Moneyball, a baseball drama directed by Bennett Miller and starring Brad Pitt.

But in all, The Artist remains the current favorite for the 2012 Best Picture Oscar – despite the fierce competition from reliable Hollywood names. Likely Best Picture nominees include Alexander Payne's The Descendants, Martin Scorsese's Hugo, and Steven Spielberg's War Horse.

Besides Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo, The Artist also features Uggie the dog, Penelope Ann Miller, John Goodman, Missi Pyle, veteran Malcolm McDowell (If…., A Clockwork Orange), and Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee James Cromwell (Babe, 1995), whose parents were filmmaker John Cromwell (Of Human Bondage, The Prisoner of Zenda) and actress Kay Johnson (Dynamite, Madam Satan).

Michael Fassbender & Carey Mulligan + Michelle Williams as Marilyn Monroe

In the acting categories, Michael Fassbender was the Detroit Film Critics' Best Actor for his performance as a troubled man who enjoys a lot of sex in Steve McQueen's Shame, while Carey Mulligan, Fassbender's equally troubled sister in the British-made psychological drama, was the Best Supporting Actress.

U.S. critics' faves Michelle Williams and Christopher Plummer were named, respectively, Best Actress for Simon Curtis' My Week with Marilyn and Best Supporting Actor for Mike Mills' Beginners.

In the former, Williams plays Marilyn Monroe during the making of Laurence Olivier's The Prince and the Showgirl. In the latter, the veteran Plummer (The Sound of Music, The Last Station) plays Ewan McGregor's gay father.

Roman Polanski's Carnage, starring Kate Winslet, Jodie Foster, Christoph Waltz, and John C. Reilly was the Best Ensemble winner. Based on Yasmine Reza's play God of Carnage, the French-Polish-Spanish-German co-production revolves around two couples battling it out after their kids get into a fight.

And finally, critics' fave Jessica Chastain was the Detroit Film Critics' Breakthrough Performance winner for three of the 2,383 movies in which she was featured during the course of 2011: Tate Taylor's The Help, Jeff Nichols' Take Shelter, and Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life.

Detroit Film Critics winners & nominations

Best Picture
* The Artist.
The Descendants.
Hugo.
Take Shelter.
The Tree of Life.

Best Director
* Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist.
Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life.
Jeff Nichols, Take Shelter.
Martin Scorsese, Hugo.
Nicholas Winding Refn, Drive.

Best Actress
Viola Davis, The Help.
Felicity Jones, Like Crazy.
Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady.
Charlize Theron, Young Adult.
* Michelle Williams, My Week with Marilyn.

Best Actor
George Clooney, The Descendants.
Jean Dujardin, The Artist.
* Michael Fassbender, Shame.
Brad Pitt, Moneyball.
Michael Shannon, Take Shelter.

Best Supporting Actress
Bérénice Bejo, The Artist.
Jessica Chastain, Take Shelter.
* Carey Mulligan, Shame.
Vanessa Redgrave, Coriolanus.
Octavia Spencer, The Help.

Best Supporting Actor
Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn.
Albert Brooks, Drive.
Ryan Gosling, Crazy Stupid Love.
Patton Oswalt, Young Adult.
* Christopher Plummer, Beginners.

Best Ensemble
* Carnage.
Cedar Rapids.
Crazy Stupid Love.
The Help.
Margin Call.
Win Win.

Best Screenplay
50/50, Will Reiser.
The Artist, Michel Hazanavicius.
Beginners, Mike Mills.
* Moneyball, Aaron Sorkin & Steven Zaillian.
Take Shelter, Jeff Nichols.

Best Documentary
Into Eternity.
Into the Abyss.
Marwencol.
* Tabloid.
We Were Here.

Breakthrough Performance
* Jessica Chastain, The Help & Take Shelter & The Tree of Life.
Felicity Jones, Like Crazy.
Melissa McCarthy, Bridesmaids.
Elizabeth Olsen, Martha Marcy May Marlene.
Shailene Woodley, The Descendants.

The Artist Jean Dujardin as dashing Douglas Fairbanks and tragic John Gilbert mix. US critics faveThe Artist with Jean Dujardin as a cross between the dashing Douglas Fairbanks, one of the biggest stars of the silent era, and the tragic John Gilbert, whose superstardom collapsed at the dawn of the sound era. Michel Hazanavicius' homage to Old Hollywood – mixing elements from, among other classics, A Star Is Born (and its predecessor, What Price Hollywood?) and Singin' in the Rain – has become the clear favorite among U.S. critics this awards season. Besides being the Best Film and Best Director choice of the Detroit Film Critics Society, the French-Belgian, black-and-white, and nearly all silent The Artist swept the Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards, topping eight categories, including Best Film, Best Director, Best Actor (Jean Dujardin), Best Supporting Actress (Bérénice Bejo), and Best Original Screenplay (Michel Hazanavicius).

'The Artist' sweeps Phoenix Film Critics Awards

Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist has won another award from a U.S.-based film critics group. The Phoenix Film Critics Society has selected the (mostly) French-made (mostly) silent comedy-drama as the Best Film of 2011.

Besides, Hazanavicius was chosen Best Director, the writer of the Best Original Screenplay, and (the best) Breakthrough Performance Behind the Camera, while The Artist leading man Jean Dujardin was named Best Actor and the film's leading lady, Bérénice Bejo, was the Best Supporting Actress. (Every so often there's a fine line between what amounts to a lead or a supporting role.)

If that weren't all, The Artist was also singled out in the Best Score, Best Film Editing, and Best Costume Design categories.

Elizabeth Olsen & Albert Brooks

Despite The Artist's sweep, several other movies managed to come out victorious in Phoenix as well.

For starters, Martha Marcy May Marlene leading lady Elizabeth Olsen was a relatively unusual Best Actress pick – Michelle Williams has been dominating that field for her performance as Marilyn Monroe in My Week with Marilyn. Yet Olsen hasn't been fully ignored this awards season, as she has been not infrequently shortlisted either among the year's “breakthrough performers” or as a Best Actress nominee/runner-up.

Curiously, Elizabeth Olsen lost the Breakthrough Performance on Camera award to Thomas Horn, the young actor in Stephen Daldry's Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Horn was also the winner in the Best Performance by a Youth in a Lead or Supporting Role, Male category.

U.S. critics' fave Albert Brooks was the Best Supporting Actor for his uncharacteristic turn as a tough gangster in Nicolas Winding Refn's thriller Drive, starring Ryan Gosling and Carey Mulligan. The Oscar this year will likely go to either Brooks or fellow veteran Christopher Plummer for Beginners.

Gender-bending Pedro Almodóvar & 'Super 8' surprise

Pedro Almodóvar's gender-bending The Skin I Live In, featuring Antonio Banderas and Elena Anaya as, respectively, a mad doctor-cum-kidnapper and his victim, was the Best Foreign Language Film.

J.J. Abrams' sci-fi thriller Super 8, featuring Elle Fanning, Kyle Chandler, and Bruce Greenwood, was the surprising Best Ensemble winner – beating out Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris, Steven Soderbergh's Contagion, Paul Feig's Bridesmaids, and J.C. Chandor's Margin Call.

The Best Adapted Screenplay mention went to Tate Taylor for the sleeper box office hit The Help, starring Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Viola Davis. Andrew Rossi's Page One: Inside the New York Times, set in the Times' newsroom, was the Best Documentary.

Best Film for Adults Only?

Among the Phoenix Film Critics' other winners were:

  • Gore Verbinski's Rango, featuring the voices of Johnny Depp and Isla Fisher, as Best Animated Film.
  • Martin Scorsese's 3D adventure fantasy and early cinema homage Hugo for Best Production Design and Best Visual Effects.
  • James Bobin's kiddie flick The Muppets, starring Amy Adams and Jason Segel, as the Best Live Action Family Film.

Unfortunately, the Phoenix Film Critics have no Best Film for Adults Only category; else, Steve McQueen's NC-17-rated Shame, starring Michael Fassbender as a troubled man with a very high sex drive, might have taken home an award, too.

Also worth noting – considering that we're talking about an Arizona-based film critics' group – the Phoenix Film Critics' Overlooked Film of the Year was Chris Weitz's A Better Life, which stars SAG Award nominee Demián Bichir as an undocumented Mexican immigrant struggling to eke out a living in Los Angeles.

Best Film
* The Artist.
The Descendants.
Drive.
The Help.
Hugo.
Midnight in Paris.
Moneyball.
My Week with Marilyn.
Super 8.
The Tree of Life.

Best Foreign Language Film
Incendies.
Point Blank.
* The Skin I Live In.

Best Director
Woody Allen, Midnight in Paris.
* Michael Hazanavicius, The Artist.
Alexander Payne, The Descendants.
Martin Scorsese, Hugo.
Tate Taylor, The Help.

Best Actress
Glenn Close, Albert Nobbs.
Viola Davis, The Help.
* Elizabeth Olsen, Martha Marcy May Marlene.
Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady.
Michelle Williams, My Week with Marilyn.

Best Actor
George Clooney, The Descendants.
* Jean Dujardin, The Artist.
Michael Fassbender, Shame.
Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
Brad Pitt, Moneyball.

Best Supporting Actress
* Bérénice Bejo, The Artist.
Bryce Dallas Howard, The Help.
Jessica Chastain, The Help.
Octavia Spencer, The Help.
Shailene Woodley, The Descendants.

Best Supporting Actor
Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn.
* Albert Brooks, Drive.
John Hawkes, Martha Marcy May Marlene.
Jonah Hill, Moneyball.
Christopher Plummer, Beginners.

Best Ensemble Acting
Bridesmaids.
Contagion.
Margin Call.
Midnight in Paris.
* Super 8.

Best Original Screenplay
* The Artist.
Beginners.
Midnight in Paris.

Best Adapted Screenplay
The Descendants.
* The Help.
Hugo.

Best Documentary
African Cats.
The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.
* Page One: Inside the New York Times.
Project Nim.

Best Original Song
“I Believe in You,” Johnny English Reborn.
* “Life's a Happy Song,” The Muppets.
“The Living Proof,” The Help.
“Star Spangled Man,” Captain America: The First Avenger.

Best Original Score
* The Artist.
Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.
Moneyball.
Super 8.

Best Cinematography
The Artist.
Hugo.
* The Tree of Life.

Best Film Editing
* The Artist.
Super 8.
The Tree of Life.

Best Production Design
The Artist.
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.
* Hugo.

Best Costume Design
* The Artist.
Hugo.
Jane Eyre.

Best Animated Film
The Adventures of Tintin.
* Rango.
Winnie the Pooh.

Best Visual Effects
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.
* Hugo.
Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Best Stunts
* Drive.
Fast Five.
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.

Breakthrough Performance on Camera
Elle Fanning, Super 8.
* Thomas Horn, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.
Elizabeth Olsen, Martha Marcy May Marlene.
Shailene Woodley, The Descendants.

Breakthrough Performance Behind the Camera
Sean Durkin, Martha Marcy May Marlene.
* Michael Hazanavicius, The Artist.
Tate Taylor, The Help.

Best Performance by a Youth in a Lead or Supporting Role, Male
Asa Butterfield, Hugo.
Joel Courtney, Super 8.
* Thomas Horn, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.

Best Performance by a Youth in a Lead or Supporting Role, Female
Elle Fanning, Super 8.
Amara Miller, The Descendants.
Chloë Grace Moretz, Hugo.
* Saoirse Ronan, Hanna.

Best Live Action Family Film
Dolphin Tale.
Hugo.
* The Muppets.
We Bought a Zoo.

Best Overlooked Film
* A Better Life.
The Conspirator.
Texas Killing Fields.

The Tree of Life Brad Pitt: Family drama and search for the meaning of life mixThe Tree of Life with Brad Pitt. The Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or winner hasn't been the top choice in the U.S. this awards season, as most critics groups have gone either for Michel Hazanavicius' Old Hollywood homage The Artist or Alexander Payne's middle-age crises – there are several – comedy-drama The Descendants. The Chicago Film Critics Association, however, has opted for Terrence Malick's mix of family drama and search for the meaning of life (if any), The Tree of Life, starring Sean Penn as a troubled middle-aged man remembering his life as a kid with his philosophically disparate parents, Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain, in Waco, Texas, in the mid-1950s.

Chicago Film Critics go their own way: 'The Tree of Life' voted Best Film

Most U.S.-based film critics' groups have chosen either Alexander Payne's The Descendants or Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist as the year's Best Film. Not so the Chicago Film Critics Association, which selected instead Terrence Malick's cosmically inclined family drama The Tree of Life, which earlier this year won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, and Jessica Chastain star.

In addition to its Best Film victory, The Tree of Life also won awards for director Malick, Best Supporting Actress Chastain, and Emmanuel Lubezki's cinematography. Lubezki (Children of Men, The New World, Sleepy Hollow) has been a critical favorite this year, and will quite possibly take home the Best Cinematography Academy Award as well.

Another surprise Chicago Film Critics' winner was Michael Shannon, who plays a disturbed man in Jeff Nichols' Take Shelter. The Descendants' George Clooney has been the U.S. critics' favorite male lead to date, though Shannon has topped a few lists as well.

Iranian drama & Marilyn Monroe

Other Chicago Film Critics winners fell more in line with most other U.S.-based critics' groups:

  • Asghar Farhadi's Golden Bear-winning Iranian family drama A Separation was the Best Foreign Language Film.
  • Michelle Williams was chosen Best Actress for her portrayal of Marilyn Monroe in Simon Curtis' My Week with Marilyn.
  • Albert Brooks was the Best Supporting Actor for Nicolas Winding Refn's thriller Drive.
  • Gore Verbinski's Johnny Depp-voiced Rango was Best Animated Film.

Despite its six nominations, The Descendants didn't win anything, but The Artist received a Best Original Screenplay citation for Michel Hazanavicius. Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin wrote the Best Adapted Screenplay: Moneyball.

And finally … Set in Chicago's low-income communities, Steve James' The Interrupters was the Best Documentary, a “surprise” only in that other U.S. critics groups have opted for other titles such as Werner Herzog's Cave of Forgotten Dreams and Asif Kapadia's Senna.

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy: Gary Oldman as George Smiley. John le Carré Cold War novel is London faveTinker Tailor Soldier Spy with Gary Oldman. Based on John le Carré's 1974 Cold War spy novel, Tomas Alfredson's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy stars Gary Oldman as British intelligence officer George Smiley, who is brought back from retirement to handle another convoluted cat-and-mouse game: a top British spy may actually be a Soviet mole. But who? And why should anyone care? George Smiley has been previously portrayed by Rupert Davies (The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, 1965), James Mason (The Deadly Affair, 1966), Alec Guinness (in two BBC TV series: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, 1979; Smiley's People, 1982), and Denholm Elliott (the TV movie A Murder of Quality, 1991). The male-centered cast of the 2011 Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy also features Best Actor Oscar winner Colin Firth (The King's Speech, 2010), Tom Hardy, John Hurt, Mark Strong, Toby Jones, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ciarán Hinds, David Dencik, Simon McBurney, and Kathy Burke. Bridget O'Connor and Peter Straughan were credited for the adaptation.

London Film Critics nominations: Sareh Bayat for the Oscars?

So, does A Separation actress Sareh Bayat have a chance at a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination?

If only a nomination for the London Film Critics' Circle Awards had that sort of influence. Were that so, Nicolas Winding Refn's thriller Drive and Tomas Alfredson's spy drama Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, each nominated for six awards, would surely be shortlisted for the Best Picture Academy Award. (See further below the full list of the London Film Critics' 2011 nominations.)

Double nominee Gary Oldman

Veteran Gary Oldman (Sid and Nancy, Prick Up Your Ears), a double nominee, would also be a front-runner for the Best Actor Oscar.

“I am proud of my work in [Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy], and so very proud of the film” Oldman said after learning of his London Film Critics' nods. “The London Critics' Circle has reaffirmed that we have made a film that remains genuine, first rate 'cinema.' Indeed, it is gratifying to be among the representatives of the best of British, and it always will be.”

Among the other “best of British” nominees are We Need to Talk About Kevin director Lynne Ramsay and actress Tilda Swinton, My Week with Marilyn actor Kenneth Branagh (as Laurence Olivier), and Coriolanus actress Vanessa Redgrave.

Gary Oldman's other nomination, by the way, was in the Best Actor (or Actor of the Year) category, alongside Britisher and fellow double nominee Michael Fassbender (Shame), Canadian Ryan Gosling (Drive), Frenchman Jean Dujardin (The Artist), and American George Clooney (The Descendants).

International Best Film list

Drive and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy are vying for Film of the Year, along with Asghar Farhadi's Berlin Film Festival winner A Separation; Terrence Malick's Cannes Film Festival winner The Tree of Life; and Michel Hazanavicius' French-Belgian The Artist, which is also up for Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Actor (Jean Dujardin).

In addition, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is listed among the contenders for British Film of the Year, while A Separation is one of the five Best Foreign Language Film nominees.

Few surprising inclusions in acting categories

The acting categories feature mostly names also found on U.S.-based critics' lists – e.g., the aforementioned Michael Fassbender, Jean Dujardin, and George Clooney, in addition to Michelle Williams, Meryl Streep, and Jessica Chastain – but there are several exceptions as well.

In addition to Sareh Bayat, other “unusual” names found on the London Film Critics' various shortlists are:

  • Best Actress nominees Anna Paquin for Kenneth Lonergan's psychological drama Margaret and Cannes Film Festival winner Kirsten Dunst for Lars von Trier's European Film Award-winning apocalyptic family drama Melancholia.
  • Best Supporting Actor nominees Simon Russell Beale for Terence Davies' romantic drama The Deep Blue Sea and Michael Smiley for Ben Wheatley's thriller Kill List.
  • Animal Kingdom actress Jacki Weaver, who was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar earlier this year; David Michôd's Australian crime family drama Animal Kingdom opened in both its native country and the U.S. in 2010.

The London Film Critics' Circle awards will be held on Thursday, Jan. 19, at BFI Southbank in London.

Update: London Film Critics' Circle winners.

Best Film
The Artist.
Drive.
A Separation.
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
The Tree of Life.

Attenborough Award for Best British Film
The Guard.
Kill List.
Shame.
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
We Need to Talk About Kevin.

Best Foreign Language Film
Mysteries of Lisbon.
Poetry.
Le Quattro Volte.
A Separation.
The Skin I Live In.

Best Director
Asghar Farhadi, A Separation.
Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist.
Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life.
Lynne Ramsay, We Need to Talk About Kevin.
Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive.

Best Actor
George Clooney, The Descendants.
Jean Dujardin, The Artist.
Michael Fassbender, Shame.
Ryan Gosling, Drive.
Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

Best Actress
Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia.
Anna Paquin, Margaret.
Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady.
Tilda Swinton, We Need to Talk About Kevin.
Michelle Williams, My Week with Marilyn.

Best Supporting Actress
Sareh Bayat, A Separation.
Jessica Chastain, The Help.
Vanessa Redgrave, Coriolanus.
Octavia Spencer, The Help.
Jacki Weaver, Animal Kingdom.

Best Supporting Actor
Simon Russell Beale, The Deep Blue Sea.
Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn.
Albert Brooks, Drive.
Christopher Plummer, Beginners.
Michael Smiley, Kill List.

Best British Actress
Olivia Colman, The Iron Lady & Tyrannosaur.
Carey Mulligan, Drive & Shame.
Vanessa Redgrave, Anonymous & Coriolanus.
Tilda Swinton, We Need to Talk About Kevin.
Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea.

Best British Actor
Tom Cullen, Weekend.
Michael Fassbender, A Dangerous Method & Shame.
Brendan Gleeson, The Guard.
Peter Mullan, Tyrannosaur & War Horse.
Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

Best Screenwriter
Asghar Farhadi, A Separation.
Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist.
Kenneth Lonergan, Margaret.
Bridget O'Connor & Peter Straughan, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon & Jim Rash, The Descendants.

Best Documentary
Cave of Forgotten Dreams.
Dreams of a Life.
Pina.
Project Nim.
Senna.

Breakthrough British Filmmaker
Richard Ayoade, Submarine.
Paddy Considine, Tyrannosaur.
Joe Cornish, Attack the Block.
Andrew Haigh, Weekend.
John Michael McDonagh, The Guard.

Young British Performer
John Boyega, Attack the Block.
Jeremy Irvine, War Horse.
Yasmin Paige, Submarine.
Craig Roberts, Submarine.
Saoirse Ronan, Hanna.

Best Technical Achievement
Manuel Alberto Claro, cinematography, Melancholia.
Paul Davies, sound design, We Need to Talk About Kevin.
Maria Djurkovic, production design, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
Dante Ferretti, production design, Hugo.
Alberto Iglesias, original score, The Skin I Live In.
Chris King & Gregers Sall, editing, Senna.
Joe Letteri, visual effects, Rise of the Planet of the Apes.
Cliff Martinez, original score, Drive.
Robert Richardson, cinematography, Hugo.
Robbie Ryan, cinematography, Wuthering Heights.

The Dilys Powell Award for Excellence in Film
Nicolas Roeg.

 

Chicago Film Critics Association website.

Joyce McKinney Tabloid image: Sundance Selects.

Brad Pitt The Tree of Life image: Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Jean Dujardin The Artist image: The Weinstein Company.

Gary Oldman Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy image: Focus Features.


         
If you liked the article Film Critics Awards: Mormon Missionary Sex Slave Documentary Unexpected Win, please recommend it to your friends and/or follow Alt Film Guide on social media. See share/follow buttons above.
Film Critics Awards: Mormon Missionary Sex Slave Documentary Unexpected Win © 2004–2017 Alt Film Guide and/or author(s).
Text NOT to be reproduced without prior written consent.

Leave a comment about 'Film Critics Awards: Mormon Missionary Sex Slave Documentary Unexpected Win'

UPDATED COMMENTING RULES: Our articles and/or other people's comments infuriate you?

Well, here's the good news: It's perfectly okay to disagree with our own and/or other commenters' views and opinions.

But ... *thoughtfulness* and *at least a modicum of sanity* are imperative.

In other words: Add something reasonable & coherent to the discussion.

Spammy, abusive, bigoted, baseless (spreading misinformation), trollish/inflammatory, and/or just plain demented comments will be zapped and offenders may be banned.

Also, bear in mind that links found in comments will generally be deleted.

Most recent comments listed on top.

2 Comments to Film Critics Awards: Mormon Missionary Sex Slave Documentary Unexpected Win

  1. sm

    Katie,

    The word “troubled” - which I used in another article while describing Fassbender's character in “Shame” — was missing from this post. I've added it just now. As for the word “enjoy,” I used it in the sense of “to experience.” And that he does.

  2. Katie

    Uhm,

    “In the acting categories, Michael Fassbender was the Best Actor for his performance as a man who enjoys a lot of sex in Steve McQueen's Shame”

    Really? Please go and watch the movie and you will discover that the sex Fassbender's character is “enjoying” in Shame is not pleasurable or even sexy. He is a sex addict, but there is no joy in sex in Shame. Shame is to sex what Requiem for a Dream is to drugs. Really guys, go and watch Shame.