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Anne Bancroft: Articles


'Strangers on a Train,' 'The Graduate': Last Remaining Seats

Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate The L.A. Conservancy has announced a list of tentative titles for the 2010 edition of “Last Remaining Seats,” held annually at old movie palaces in downtown Los Angeles. They are: How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967), a musical satire with Robert Morse and Jonathan Winters; Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train (1951), with Farley Granger, Robert Walker, and Ruth Roman; George Lucas' gigantic sleeper hit American Graffiti (1973), featuring lots of newcomers including Richard Dreyfuss, Harrison Ford, Suzanne Somers, and Candy Clark; and Mike Nichols' The Graduate (1967), with Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, and Katharine Ross. None of the above could be considered a “rarity,” but perhaps showing rare movies isn't the […]


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'Strangers on a Train,' 'The Graduate': Last Remaining Seats



Mel Brooks Tribute

Anne Bancroft, Mel Brooks in To Be or Not to Be (top); Mel Brooks at the 1969 Oscar ceremony (bottom) The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present a tribute to Mel Brooks on Friday, July 24, at 8 p.m. at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Hosted by film historian Leonard Maltin, the evening will feature numerous film clips and stories from his artistic collaborators and friends, in addition to Brooks himself. Schedules permitting, special guests will include Richard Benjamin, Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, Carl Reiner, Tracey Ullman and Lesley Ann Warren. The Brooklyn-born comedian, writer, producer, director, composer, and actor Mel Brooks won an Academy Award for the original story and screenplay of the 1968 […]


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Mel Brooks Tribute



Marie Dressler, Claude Rains & Anne Bancroft Movies

Monday-Wednesday, August 4-6, highlights on Turner Classic Movies: Monday is Marie Dressler Day. What could be there not to recommend? Well, Emma, for one, is an appallingly sudsy melodrama, and Dressler herself is quite weak as the nanny who gives it all – and still must pay for her (sort of) good deeds. Even so, Emma is one of those bad movies that should be watched at least once, if only for historical reasons. Emma was one of MGM's biggest hits of 1932, Dressler received a best actress nod for the period 1931-32 (she lost to Helen Hayes in the equally cataclysmic The Sin of Madelon Claudet), while the cast includes Jean Hersholt (after whom the Academy's humanitarian award was […]


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Marie Dressler, Claude Rains & Anne Bancroft Movies