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Elizabeth Taylor: Articles


'Boom!' Movie: Elizabeth Taylor & Richard Burton Cinematic Disaster Reappraised

Boom! movie with Elizabeth Taylor: Critically panned box office disaster featuring memorable headwear and situations. 'Boom!' movie: Elizabeth Taylor & Richard Burton critical & box office bomb reappraised as 'cult classic' fare If you've never seen Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton's 1968 vanity production Boom!, don't feel singled out. Boom! bombed at the box office almost as soon as it blasted on the screen. Since then, however, it has been rediscovered. Directed by Joseph Losey from a screenplay by Tennessee Williams (based on his play The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore), Boom! is a good example of a movie depicting art imitating life imitating art; one that deserves to be described in detail. Sexually repressed temper tantrums and bronchial […]


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'Boom!' Movie: Elizabeth Taylor & Richard Burton Cinematic Disaster Reappraised



'Judgment at Nuremberg' & Joan Fontaine: Kramer's Best 'Message Movie' & Only Hitchcock Acting Oscar Winner

Judgment at Nuremberg with Maximilian Schell. Stanley Kramer's most effective “message movie,” the 1961 courtroom/political drama Judgment at Nuremberg is a fictionalized restaging of the post-World War II Judges' Trial of Nazi Germany judges and prosecutors held in the Bavarian city of Nuremberg in 1947. Besides its mostly effective all-star cast (Maximilian Schell, Spencer Tracy, Montgomery Clift, Judy Garland) and top production values, Judgment at Nuremberg works so well because Kramer and Oscar-winning screenwriter Abby Mann refuse to turn the defeated Nazis into caricatures of evil. What we thus witness is the trial of a group of human beings who committed heinous acts when the occasion required/allowed them to. “Just obeying orders,” or…? Packard Theater movies: From 'Judgment at Nuremberg […]


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'Judgment at Nuremberg' & Joan Fontaine: Kramer's Best 'Message Movie' & Only Hitchcock Acting Oscar Winner



Tabloid Journalism & Studio-Manufactured Hollywood Affairs

Long history of real and manufactured box-office-boosting off-screen romances Long before tabloids and tabloid-wannabes took over as the purveyors of entertainment “news,” throughout the decades the studios themselves have publicized idyllic off-screen love stories, whether real or manufactured, featuring the stars of their latest releases. Not infrequently, those had the tacit or not-so-tacit consent of the actors in question; invariably, they were eagerly swallowed by a gullible (i.e., wilfully stupid) general public. That strategy goes all the way back to the early silent era, when in the 1910s the likes of Francis X. Bushman (the 1925 Ben-Hur's Messala) and Beverly Bayne romanced on screen and off – though the eventual revelation that Bushman was the married father of five kids […]


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Tabloid Journalism & Studio-Manufactured Hollywood Affairs