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Fritz Lang: Articles


'Die Nibelungen' Movies': Powerful Women in Masterful, 'Otherworldly' Germanic Tragedy

'Die Nibelungen: Siegfried': Paul Richter as the dragon-slaying hero of medieval Germanic mythology. 'Die Nibelungen': Enthralling silent classic despite complex plot and countless characters Based on the medieval epic poem Nibelungenlied, itself inspired by the early medieval Germanic saga about the Burgundian royal family, Fritz Lang's two-part Die Nibelungen is one of those movies I can enjoy many times without ever really understanding who's who and what's what. After all, the semi-historical, fantasy/adventure epic is packed with intrigue, treachery, deceit, hatred, murder, and sex. And that's just the basic plotline. As seen in Kino's definitive two-disc edition, artistically and cinematically speaking Die Nibelungen contains some of the greatest visual compositions I've ever seen. Filmed mostly in long shots that frame […]


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'Die Nibelungen' Movies': Powerful Women in Masterful, 'Otherworldly' Germanic Tragedy



'Metropolis' Poster: $850,000

Metropolis original poster Who says silent movies don't make money? Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist has grossed more than $100 million worldwide, in addition to winning a total of five Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor (Jean Dujardin). And now comes an original poster of Fritz Lang's 1927 UFA classic Metropolis, which you can buy now for $850,000 at Movie Poster Exchange. The information below is from MPE: Posters from this all-time classic science-fiction film are the rarest of the rare and this, the most famous image ever associated with the film is no exception. Created by art deco artist Heinz Schulz-Neudamm, this poster depicts the classic image of the automation Maria and the fantastic cityscape of […]


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'Metropolis' Poster: $850,000



'Metropolis' & Agatha Christie: BFI Southbank Screenings

Brigitte Helm in Fritz Lang's Metropolis (top); Jack Holt, Fay Wray in Frank Capra's Dirigible (middle); Walter Huston, Barry Fitzgerald, Roland Young, Louis Hayward, Judith Anderson in René Clair's And Then There Were None (bottom) London's BFI Southbank will be screening several Frank Capra efforts today and on Saturday, in addition to films based on Agatha Christie's works and the restored Metropolis. Most notable among those screenings is probably a 1986 British television production named Shades of Darkness: Agatha Christie's The Last Séance. Directed by June Wyndham-Davies, the 50-minute show stars Jeanne Moreau in a “suitably spooky, at times surreal” supernatural tale about spiritualism. Frank Capra will be represented with Dirigible (1931), an early adventure tale set in the South […]


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'Metropolis' & Agatha Christie: BFI Southbank Screenings



'Metropolis,' Norma Talmadge and Louise Brooks: San Francisco Silent Film Festival

Louise Brooks (center) in Diary of a Lost Girl (top); Fritz Lang's sci-fi classic Metropolis (upper middle); George O'Brien (center) in John Ford's The Iron Horse (lower middle); Norma Talmadge in Sam Taylor and Henry King's The Woman Disputed (bottom) The San Francisco Silent Film Festival kicks off on July 15 with a screening of John Ford's The Iron Horse, at 7 p.m. at the Castro Theatre. The festival's Opening Night Party will follow the screening. Starring George O'Brien (the male lead in F.W. Murnau's Sunrise) and popular silent film actress Madge Bellamy, The Iron Horse is a grandiose 1924 Western epic about the building of the United States' transcontinental railroad. Among the SFSFF's other highlights are a screening of […]


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'Metropolis,' Norma Talmadge and Louise Brooks: San Francisco Silent Film Festival



Marion Davies & Ronald Colman + Fritz Lang 'Metropolis' Screening

The four-film series "Sound and Silents” – part of the wider “Birds Eye View Film Festival” celebrating women filmmakers – to be held at London's bfi Southbank and the Barbican from March 6-10. The four screening silent films are: King Vidor's The Patsy (1928), starring Marion Davies; Sidney Franklin's Her Sister from Paris (1925), starring Constance Talmadge and Ronald Colman (right); Cecil B. DeMille's Chicago (1927), with Phyllis Haver and Victor Varconi; and Lotte Reiniger's animated The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926). All four films will feature live musical accompaniment. The most enjoyable of the four is Sidney Franklin's Lubitschesque Her Sister from Paris, which offers Constance Talmadge at her screwballish best – and this before screwball comedies became known […]


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Marion Davies & Ronald Colman + Fritz Lang 'Metropolis' Screening



TCM Classic Film Festival: 'A Star Is Born' & 'Metropolis'

Judy Garland in A Star Is Born (top); Brigitte Helm in Metropolis (middle); Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean Seberg in Breathless (bottom) Turner Classic Movies' first-ever TCM Classic Film Festival, which will be held on April 22-25, 2010, in Hollywood, will feature the world premiere of a newly restored edition of George Cukor's A Star is Born (1954), starring Judy Garland and James Mason; the North American premiere of the restored version of Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927); and a 50th anniversary screening of Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless, starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg. The TCM Classic Film Festival will also feature a special presentation of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, including a discussion with Oscar-winning visual-effects artist Douglas Trumbull. Among other guests […]


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TCM Classic Film Festival: 'A Star Is Born' & 'Metropolis'



Fritz Lang, Joan Bennett: UCLA Festival of Preservation

Friday, March 20 7:30 p.m. Preservation funded by the Film Noir Foundation and The Stanford Theatre Foundation THE PROWLER (1951, Joseph Losey) Set in a shadowy post-war Los Angeles, The Prowler focuses on a wealthy but neglected housewife (Evelyn Keyes) who spends her evenings alone, with only her husband's voice on the radio for company. When she's spooked by a peeping tom, a calculating cop (Van Heflin) answers the call, turning her ordered life upside down. The Prowler was the third of five films Losey made in Hollywood, and the most critically and commercially successful. The following year Losey was officially blacklisted and soon embarked on a career abroad where he eventually earned a reputation as a European auteur. Horizon […]


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Fritz Lang, Joan Bennett: UCLA Festival of Preservation



'Contempt' Movie Review: Brigitte Bardot and Jean-Luc Godard

Of the films I've seen so far of French New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard, his best is Le Mépris / Contempt (1963), adapted by Godard from Alberto Moravia's novel Il Disprezzo (published in English as The Ghost at Noon). That statement should not be taken as an acknowledgement of greatness, for although this is his best film, it is not close to being a great film. Despite a gorgeous aping of Michelangelo Antonioni's style of shooting widescreen landscapes and his affinity for formal structures, Le Mépris lacks any of the metaphysical heft and narrative thrust that propel the best of Antonioni's work, e.g., La Notte or Blow-Up. If Antonioni were more pretentious and less of a wellspring of ideas, he […]


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'Contempt' Movie Review: Brigitte Bardot and Jean-Luc Godard





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