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George Cukor: Articles


Gay Hollywood on TCM

Considering everything that's been happening on the planet in the last several months, you'd have thought we're already in November or December – of 2117. But no. It's only June. 2017. And in some parts of the world, that's the month of brides, fathers, graduates, gays, and climate change denial. Beginning this evening, Thursday, June 1, Turner Classic Movies will be focusing on one of these June groups: LGBT people, specifically those in the American film industry. Following the presentation of about 10 movies featuring Frank Morgan, who would have turned 127 years old today, TCM will set its cinematic sights on the likes of William Haines, James Whale, George Cukor, Mitchell Leisen, Dorothy Arzner, Patsy Kelly, and Ramon Novarro. […]


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Gay Hollywood on TCM



George Cukor Gay Woman's Director Nonsense

George Cukor 'gay Woman's Director'? Known as a refined “woman's director,” George Cukor has had his considerable output either relegated to the sidelines or simply dismissed by those who like their directors macho and their films male-centered. Not helping matters is the general perception that Cukor was merely a hired hand for the likes of David O. Selznick at RKO and Louis B. Mayer at MGM, instead of an auteur following a clear professional path.* Except, of course, for the (assumed) fact that he was a woman's director – and we're back to square one. George Cukor directing style In truth, George Cukor was one of the most accomplished directors of the studio era. His movies may lack the wide […]


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George Cukor Gay Woman's Director Nonsense



Raquel Welch on TCM

Spencer Tracy, Judy Holliday, Katharine Hepburn in George Cukor's Adam's Rib Raquel Welch is the guest programmer tonight on Turner Classic Movies. Welch and Robert Osborne will be introducing and discussing four Hollywood classics: Adam's Rib (1949), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), and To Have and Have Not (1945). One thing those movies have in common is strong roles for women, even though Jean Arthur's and Lauren Bacall's are subordinate to those of James Stewart and Humphrey Bogart. Audrey Hepburn was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for Breakfast at Tiffany's. Katharine Hepburn wasn't for Adam's Rib, though she should have been. Too bad Welch won't be discussing Myra Breckinridge, which also had a couple […]


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Raquel Welch on TCM