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Matthew Kennedy: Articles


Joan Blondell Bio: Warner Bros. Movies & Real Life Love Triangle + Condom Censorship

Joan Blondell biography. Joan Blondell. Those who have heard the name will most likely picture either a blowsy, older woman playing the worldwise but warm-hearted saloon owner in the late 1960s television series Here Come the Brides, or a lively, fast-talking, no-nonsense, and unconventionally sexy gold digger in numerous Pre-Code Warner Bros. comedies and musicals of the early 1930s. Matthew Kennedy's Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes (University Press of Mississippi, 2007) seeks to rectify that cultural memory lapse. Not that Blondell doesn't deserve to be remembered for Here Come the Brides or, say, Gold Diggers of 1933, Footlight Parade, Havana Widows, and Broadway Bad. It's just that her other work – from her immensely touching performance as a sexually […]


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Joan Blondell Bio: Warner Bros. Movies & Real Life Love Triangle + Condom Censorship



Tyrone Power V: Sexual Orientation Rumors

Mai Zetterling, Tyrone Power. Two two co-starred in the 1957 drama Seven Waves Away / Abandon Ship. Tyrone Power IV: Bisexuality, Cesar Romero Rumors [Right: Tyrone Power in Jesse James.] The other thing that cracks me up – and I've done a study of this – if someone is outed as gay in a book, the next tell-all that comes out lists that person as someone's gay lover, whereas in previous books, that liaison was never mentioned. A great example is Marlon Brando. A book comes out about him and now he has slept with absolutely every single man who ever walked the earth. Absolutely no discretion on Marlon's part – if an author said someone was gay, Marlon got […]


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Tyrone Power V: Sexual Orientation Rumors



Edmund Goulding: Renowned Filmmaker with Controversial Private Life - Q&A with Biographer Matthew Kennedy

Edmund Goulding directs a young Joan Crawford in the MGM melodrama Sally, Irene and Mary (1925) at the beginning of their, respectively, directorial and acting careers. Photo: Matthew Kennedy Collection.   Even though the Academy Award-winning Grand Hotel (1932), the Bette Davis weepie Dark Victory (1939), and the Academy Award-nominated The Razor's Edge (1946) are still well remembered, the man who directed them has generally been ignored by film historians – and is all but forgotten by both film audiences and film critics. The two chief problems with the English-born Edmund Goulding (1891-1959) – those that make him “irrelevant” to most film historians (and therefore to film audiences and critics) – are the following: Much like Jack Conway, W.S. Van […]


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Edmund Goulding: Renowned Filmmaker with Controversial Private Life - Q&A with Biographer Matthew Kennedy