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Michelangelo Antonioni: Articles


'Blow-Up' Movie Analysis: Michelangelo Antonioni Great Work of Art

'Blow-Up' with David Hemmings and Veruschka. 'Blow-Up' movie analysis: Michelangelo Antonioni creates great work of art and philosophy Made in Great Britain in 1966, the flat-out great Blow-Up (in the U.K., Blow-Up) was Michelangelo Antonioni's first English-language effort. “Inspired” by Argentinean writer Julio Cortázar's 1959 short story Las babas del diablo (literally, “The Devil's Drool”), Blow-Up was nominated for two Academy Awards – Best Director and Best Original Screenplay (Michelangelo Antonioni, Tonino Guerra, and Edward Bond) – in addition to winning the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and the National Society of Film Critics' Best Film Award. Having first seen the two Hollywood films most influenced by Blow-Up, Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation (1974) and Brian De Palma's […]


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'Blow-Up' Movie Analysis: Michelangelo Antonioni Great Work of Art



'Il Grido' 1957: Michelangelo Antonioni Neorealist Classic

'Il Grido' 1957: Michelangelo Antonioni at his Neo-Realist best So much attention has been paid to Italian filmmaker Michelangelo Antonioni's films from the 1960s that his earlier Neo-Realist efforts have been overlooked – as if they represented the work of nothing more than a talented tyro. But even though Antonioni was not as consciously “experimental” in his early films as he was in those of his Alienation Trilogy (L'Avventura, La Notte, and L'Eclisse), and in later classics such as Blow-Up and The Passenger, his Neo-Realist films were both well written and visually accomplished, playing upon the viewers' emotions and providing them with believable characters and situations. That Michelangelo Antonioni's film career started out in documentaries should come as no surprise […]


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'Il Grido' 1957: Michelangelo Antonioni Neorealist Classic



Ingmar Bergman & Michelangelo Antonioni: Film Giants Died on the Same Day

Director Ingmar Bergman and his camera. Ingmar Bergman & Michelangelo Antonioni: Two film giants and their 'early / later' works Ingmar Bergman and Michelangelo Antonioni died on the same day – July 30, 2007. In the New York Times, film critic A.O. Scott remembered the two filmmakers: “The two of them – along with the other masters whose work had defined, from the mid-'50s through the late '60s, a golden age of high-brow movie love – were pillars in the pantheon, canonical figures toward whom the only acceptable posture was one of veneration. They were discussed in seminar rooms, dissected in honors theses and ritualistically projected in darkened dining halls by the more serious of the campus film societies. “This […]


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Ingmar Bergman & Michelangelo Antonioni: Film Giants Died on the Same Day