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Film Reviews: Articles


'Black Panther' Movie Review: History-Making Superhero Flick Features Phenomenal Michael B. Jordan

Black Panther movie with Chadwick Boseman. Directed and co-written by Ryan Coogler, Disney/Marvel's Black Panther is the first big-budget release centering on a black superhero – played by Marshall and Message from the King actor Chadwick Boseman, T'Challa a.k.a. the Black Panther is the ruler of the immensely wealthy, eyepoppingly hi-tech land of Wakanda, where the energy-manipulating metal vibranium is found in abundance. Co-written by Joe Robert Cole, Black Panther traces T'Challa's struggle to protect both his place of birth and the planet itself from greedy vibranium thieves. 'Black Panther' movie review: First black superhero flick offers 'deep contemplation of the tribulations of black people' Black Panther, the first studio-produced motion picture to feature a black superhero and a predominantly […]


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'Black Panther' Movie Review: History-Making Superhero Flick Features Phenomenal Michael B. Jordan



'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics

Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A […]


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'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics



'Detroit': Marketable Thriller Instead of Real-Life Tragedy

'Still-living history' See previous post: “'Detroit' Movie: Kathryn Bigelow 1967 Riots Depiction 'Horribly Real' & 'Deeply Self-Serving'.” But I'm a Black American from the 1960s, who knows this history as a history of the lives of my people in this nation. From uprisings in Philly and Harlem, to those in Watts and Ferguson (where I lived for years), these stories have been lived and told from generation to generation with the specific intention of keeping me and black boys like me alive. The idea that the police could and did kill black folks anywhere, at anytime, for any reason – or no reason at all – has been a baseline of understanding in black communities for 400 years, give or […]


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'Detroit': Marketable Thriller Instead of Real-Life Tragedy