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Raquel Welch: Articles


Raquel Welch Wigs vs. Ray Harryhausen Monsters

Raquel Welch wigs vs. Ray Harryhausen dinosaurs Raquel Welch wigs vs. Ray Harryhausen monsters: One Million Years B.C. [See previous post: “Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Dies.”] Without Charles H. Schneer as producer, Ray Harryhausen created the visual effects for the 1966 camp classic One Million Years B.C. – though, admittedly, his work in that movie played second fiddle to Raquel Welch's physical effects as a blonde-bewigged (?) cavewoman parading around Earth's pre-history in a cleavage-enhancing fur bikini. Whereas in producer Hal Roach's 1940 effort One Million B.C., lizards made up as dinosaurs made life difficult for Victor Mature and Carole Landis, in the creationist-style pre-history of the 1966 (sort-of) remake, Raquel Welch and fellow caveman John Richardson had to […]


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Raquel Welch Wigs vs. Ray Harryhausen Monsters



Raquel Welch Quotes: 'Myra Breckenridge' & Mae West

Raquel Welch quotes on Mae West: A few years ago, Raquel Welch reminisced about Mae West (photo), with whom she co-starred in 20th Century Fox's 1970 epic disaster Myra Breckinridge. “I found her surreal,” Welch recalled. “Here was this star from the '30s who had this unbelievably different way of doing things. Now she's doing this movie in 1969/70, and she's never made a color movie before in her life. I wouldn't want to undertake that at 77. I thought, She's got a lot of chutzpah and she's completely bonkers. Mae was one of those people I always felt had a distinctly masculine vibration about her. I have often ventured the opinion that she was a man in drag. [Laughs]" […]


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Raquel Welch Quotes: 'Myra Breckenridge' & Mae West



Raquel Welch on TCM

Spencer Tracy, Judy Holliday, Katharine Hepburn in George Cukor's Adam's Rib Raquel Welch is the guest programmer tonight on Turner Classic Movies. Welch and Robert Osborne will be introducing and discussing four Hollywood classics: Adam's Rib (1949), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), and To Have and Have Not (1945). One thing those movies have in common is strong roles for women, even though Jean Arthur's and Lauren Bacall's are subordinate to those of James Stewart and Humphrey Bogart. Audrey Hepburn was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for Breakfast at Tiffany's. Katharine Hepburn wasn't for Adam's Rib, though she should have been. Too bad Welch won't be discussing Myra Breckinridge, which also had a couple […]


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Raquel Welch on TCM