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Touch of Evil (1958): Articles


'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics

Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A […]


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'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous Film Noir Pays Homage to 'Touch of Evil' & Other Classics



Janet Leigh: 'Psycho' Actress, Tony Curtis Marriage

Janet Leigh Psycho star Janet Leigh, born Jeanette Helen Morrison on July 6, 1927, in Merced, California, would have turned 85 today. Despite a film and television career spanning more than five decades, Leigh is chiefly remembered for one role: the greedy (and unlucky) real-estate office worker Marion Crane, whose shower is cut short by a big, pointed knife in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. (Image: iconic Janet Leigh Psycho shower scene.) [See – and hear – also: “Janet Leigh Psycho Scream.”] But her getting bumped off 40 minutes into the film wasn't for naught: Psycho was a major box office hit in 1960, and Janet Leigh ended up earning both a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nomination (losing out to fellow […]


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Janet Leigh: 'Psycho' Actress, Tony Curtis Marriage



Charlton Heston

For an actor of such limited range, Charlton Heston, who died earlier this evening at the age of 84, had a pretty remarkable career. He starred in several of the biggest blockbusters of the 1950s and 1960s, among them The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), The Ten Commandments (1956), The Big Country (1958), Ben-Hur (1959), El Cid (1961), and Planet of the Apes (1968), and in numerous classics and near-classics of that period, ranging from the aforementioned Ben-Hur (which won a total of 11 Oscars, including Best Picture) and the box office friendly Planet of the Apes to Orson Welles' auterish flop Touch of Evil (1958) and Tom Gries' unglamorous Western Will Penny (1968). Like Paul Muni in the 1930s, […]


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Charlton Heston