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Turner Classic Movies (TCM): Articles


Ronald Colman Movies: 'A Tale of Two Cities' & 'The Prisoner of Zenda'

Ronald Colman: Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in two major 1930s classics Turner Classic Movies' July 2017 Star of the Month is Ronald Colman, one of the finest performers of the studio era. Tonight, TCM will be presenting five Colman star vehicles: A Tale of Two Cities, The Prisoner of Zenda, Kismet, Lucky Partners, and My Life with Caroline. The first two movies are among not only Colman's best, but also among Hollywood's best during its so-called Golden Age. Based on Charles Dickens' classic novel, Jack Conway's Academy Award-nominated A Tale of Two Cities (1936) is a rare Hollywood production indeed: it manages to effectively condense its sprawling source, it boasts first-rate production values, and it features a […]


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Ronald Colman Movies: 'A Tale of Two Cities' & 'The Prisoner of Zenda'



More 4th of July Escapism: Musicalized Iowa Hicks & Declaration of Independence

(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in […]


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More 4th of July Escapism: Musicalized Iowa Hicks & Declaration of Independence



Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year

Fourth of July movies: A few recommended titles that should help you temporarily escape current global madness Two thousand and seventeen has been a weirder-than-usual year on the already pretty weird Planet Earth. Unsurprisingly, this Fourth of July, the day the United States celebrates its Declaration of Independence from the British Empire, has been an unusual one as well. Instead of fireworks, (at least some) people's attention has been turned to missiles – more specifically, a carefully timed North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile test indicating that Kim Jong-un could theoretically gain (or could already have?) the capacity to strike North America with nuclear weapons. Then there were right-wing trolls & history-deficient Twitter users berating National Public Radio for tweeting the […]


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Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year