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BAFTA Nominations: Hollywood & U.K. Should Switch Academies + Isabelle Adjani Returns: Prix César

BAFTA nominations: Hollywood productions rule
BAFTA nominations: Hollywood productions rule. Above: Kathryn Bigelow’s Iraq War drama The Hurt Locker.

Some people complain that the Hollywood Academy is enamored of British productions and talent. Well, then perhaps Hollywood and the United Kingdom should switch academies, for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts can’t get enough of Hollywood fare. (See full list of BAFTA nominations here.)

James Cameron’s Hollywood blockbuster Avatar, Kathryn Bigelow’s Iraq war drama The Hurt Locker, and Lone Scherfig’s British-made coming-of-age tale An Education lead the race of BAFTA award nominees, with eight nominations apiece. All three are up for best film (An Education is also up for Best British Film), and so are Lee Daniels’ urban drama Precious and Jason Reitman’s socially conscious comedy-drama Up in the Air. All three films in the running in the animated feature category are US productions: Up, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Coraline.

Inglourious Basterds, Up in the Air, and the US/New Zealand/South African production District 9 each earned six nods. Precious got four. Eight of the nominated films in the best screenplay categories are either American productions or co-productions, which also dominate the technical and crafts categories. But British film workers shouldn’t despair.

Movies made in the UK actually dominate the Outstanding British Film and the Outstanding Debut by a British Director, Writer or Producer categories. British talent even managed to squeeze into the Hollywood-dominated acting categories, although a couple of those were shortlisted for their work in American films, e.g., Colin Firth up for a best actor BAFTA for A Single Man, and Christian McKay in the running for best supporting actor for Me and Orson Welles.

Photo: The Hurt Locker (Jonathan Olley / Summit Entertainment)

Among the BAFTA 2010 curiosities are best actress nominee Audrey Tautou for Coco Before Chanel, best actor nominee Andy Serkis for Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, best supporting actor Alec Baldwin for It’s Complicated (above, with Meryl Streep), a best original screenplay nod for The Hangover, only one nomination for Nine (for make-up and hair), the total absence of The Last Station, and no nominations in the acting/direction/cinematography categories for Jane Campion’s Bright Star. That’s what usually happens when a movie’s Award Buzzometer is low – no matter how good the movie; no matter how talented the people involved in them.

Also, Tom Hardy, whose performance in Bronson has earned him raves from critics and a best actor British Independent Film Award, had the misfortune of being a (not internationally famous) British actor starring in a very small film. No nomination. Same for Katie Jarvis in Fish Tank, though at least Jarvis made it into the BAFTA longlists announced a few weeks back. Hardy didn’t even get that far.

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is usually berated for being star-struck and all-too-eager to brownnose its way into the executive offices of the big Hollywood studios. Apart from the (very) few British films that sneaked into the top categories, a look at the BAFTA nominations shows that there isn’t that much of a difference between them and the Golden Globes.

But wait! Where the heck is Golden Globe winner Sandra Bullock?

Well, in her bed sleeping, I hope. It’s 3:56 am in Los Angeles.

But why wasn’t she nominated?

It’s simple. The Blind Side was ineligible for this year’s BAFTAs. Else, she’d likely be in the BAFTA shortlist as well, instead of Audrey Tautou or Saoirse Ronan. Theoretically, Bullock could get nominated next year, but what would be the fun? By then, all the awards buzz about her going blonde will have long fizzled out.

BEST FILM
Avatar – James Cameron, Jon Landau
An Education – Amanda Posey, Finola Dwyer
The Hurt Locker – Nominees TBC
Precious – Lee Daniels, Sarah Siegel-Magness, Gary Magness
Up In the Air – Ivan Reitman, Jason Reitman, Daniel Dubiecki

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM
An Education – Amanda Posey, Finola Dwyer, Lone Scherfig, Nick Hornby
Fish Tank – Kees Kasander, Nick Laws, Andrea Arnold
In the Loop – Kevin Loader, Adam Tandy, Armando Iannucci, Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche
Moon – Stuart Fenegan, Trudie Styler, Duncan Jones, Nathan Parker
Nowhere Boy – Kevin Loader, Douglas Rae, Robert Bernstein, Sam Taylor-Wood, Matt Greenhalgh

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Broken Embraces – Agustín Almodóvar, Pedro Almodóvar
Coco Before Chanel – Carole Scotta, Caroline Benjo, Philippe Carcassonne, Anne Fontaine
Let the Right One In – Carl Molinder, John Nordling, Tomas Alfredson
A Prophet – Pascale Caucheteux, Marco Chergui, Alix Raynaud, Jacques Audiard
The White Ribbon – Stefan Arndt, Veit Heiduschka, Margaret Menegoz, Michael Haneke

ANIMATED FILM
Coraline – Henry Selick
Fantastic Mr. FoxWes Anderson
Up – Pete Docter

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
LUCY BAILEY, ANDREW THOMPSON, ELIZABETH MORGAN HEMLOCK, DAVID PEARSON – Directors, Producers – Mugabe and the White African
ERAN CREEVY – Writer/Director – Shifty
STUART HAZELDINE – Writer/Director – Exam
DUNCAN JONES – Director – Moon
SAM TAYLOR-WOOD – Director – Nowhere Boy

DIRECTOR
Avatar – James Cameron
District 9 – Neill Blomkamp
An Education – Lone Scherfig
The Hurt Locker – Kathryn Bigelow
Inglourious Basterds – Quentin Tarantino

LEADING ACTOR
JEFF BRIDGESCrazy Heart
GEORGE CLOONEYUp In the Air
COLIN FIRTH – A Single Man
JEREMY RENNERThe Hurt Locker
ANDY SERKIS – Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll

LEADING ACTRESS
CAREY MULLIGAN – An Education
SAOIRSE RONAN – The Lovely Bones
GABOUREY SIDIBE – Precious
MERYL STREEP – Julie & Julia
AUDREY TAUTOU – Coco Before Chanel

SUPPORTING ACTOR
ALEC BALDWIN – It’s Complicated
CHRISTIAN McKAY – Me and Orson Welles
ALFRED MOLINA – An Education
STANLEY TUCCI – The Lovely Bones
CHRISTOPH WALTZ – Inglourious Basterds

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
ANNE-MARIE DUFFNowhere Boy
VERA FARMIGA – Up in the Air
ANNA KENDRICKUp in the Air
MO’NIQUE – Precious
KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS – Nowhere Boy

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
The Hangover – Jon Lucas, Scott Moore
The Hurt Locker – Mark Boal
Inglourious Basterds – Quentin Tarantino
A Serious Man – Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Up – Bob Peterson, Pete Docter

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
District 9 – Neill Blomkamp, Terri Tatchell
An Education – Nick Hornby
In the Loop – Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, Tony Roche
Precious – Geoffrey Fletcher
Up In the Air – Jason Reitman, Sheldon Turner

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Avatar – Mauro Fiore
District 9 – Trent Opaloch
The Hurt Locker – Barry Ackroyd
Inglourious Basterds – Robert Richardson
The RoadJavier Aguirresarobe

EDITING
Avatar – Stephen Rivkin, John Refoua, James Cameron
District 9 – Julian Clarke
The Hurt Locker – Bob Murawski, Chris Innis
Inglourious Basterds – Sally Menke
Up in the Air – Dana E. Glauberman

MUSIC
Avatar – James Horner
Crazy Heart – T-Bone Burnett, Stephen Bruton
Fantastic Mr. Fox – Alexandre Desplat
Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll – Chaz Jankel
Up – Michael Giacchino

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Avatar – Rick Carter, Robert Stromberg, Kim Sinclair
District 9 – Philip Ivey, Guy Poltgieter
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince – Stuart Craig, Stephenie McMillan
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus – Nominees TBC
Inglourious Basterds – David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds Wasco

COSTUME DESIGN
Bright Star – Janet Patterson
Coco Before Chanel – Catherine Leterrier
An Education – Odile Dicks-Mireaux
A Single Man – Arianne Phillips
The Young Victoria – Sandy Powell

SOUND
Avatar – Christopher Boyes, Gary Summers, Andy Nelson, Tony Johnson, Addison Teague
District 9 – Nominees TBC
The Hurt Locker – Ray Beckett, Paul N. J. Ottosson, Craig Stauffer
Star Trek – Peter J. Devlin, Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer, Mark Stoeckinger, Ben Burtt
Up – Tom Myers, Michael Silvers, Michael Semanick

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
Avatar – Joe Letteri, Stephen Rosenbaum, Richard Baneham, Andrew R. Jones
District 9 – Dan Kaufman, Peter Muyzers, Robert Habros, Matt Aitken
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince – John Richardson, Tim Burke, Tim Alexander, Nicolas Aithadi
The Hurt Locker – Richard Stutsman
Star Trek – Roger Guyett, Russell Earl, Paul Kavanagh, Burt Dalton

MAKEUP & HAIR
Coco Before Chanel – Thi Thanh Tu Nguyen, Jane Milon
An Education – Lizzie Yianni Georgiou
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus – Sarah Monzani
Nine – Peter ‘Swords’ King
The Young Victoria – Jenny Shircore

ORANGE RISING STAR AWARD
Jesse Eisenberg
Nicholas Hoult
Carey Mulligan
Tahar Rahim
Kristen Stewart

Tahar Rahim A Prophet
Tahar Rahim in A Prophet: BAFTA Orange Rising Star nominee.

Tahar Rahim & Kristen Stewart: BAFTA Orange Rising Star nominees

Jesse Eisenberg, Nicholas Hoult, Carey Mulligan, Tahar Rahim, and Kristen Stewart (but neither Robert Pattinson nor 2010 People’s Choice Award winner Taylor Lautner) are the British Academy of Film & Television’s nominees for the 2010 Orange Rising Star Award. Former Orange Rising Star winners include James McAvoy, Eva Green, and Shia LaBeouf.

According to the BAFTA site, “The Orange Rising Star Award recognises five international actors and actresses who have demonstrated exceptional talent and have begun to capture the imagination of the public as a star in the making.” You can vote for your favorite here.

In addition to Roger Dodger, Jesse Eisenberg was recently featured in Adventureland and Zombieland, while Nicholas Hoult, the solitary kid in About a Boy who finds in Hugh Grant an unwilling father, starred in Skins and had a crucial supporting role in A Single Man.

Carey Mulligan became a critics’ darling following her star-making turn in Lone Scherfig’s An Education, while Tahar Rahim won the European Film Award for best actor for Jacques Audiard’s prison drama A Prophet.

Thanks to her Bella, caught between a rocking vampire and a hard-muscled werewolf in Twilight and The Twilight Saga: New Moon, Kristen Stewart is now a star. Her other credits include Panic Room, Cold Creek Manor and Into the Wild. She’ll be next seen as Bella in The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn begins filming in Vancouver in the fall.

Photos: The Twilight Saga: New Moon (Kimberley French / Summit Entertainment); A Prophet (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics); An Education (Kerry Brown / Sony Pictures Classics)


Ben Whishaw, Abbie Cornish in Bright Star (Apparition).

With 17 mentions, Lone Scherfig’s An Education leads the 2010 British Academy of Film and Television Arts award longlists. Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds is next with 15 mentions, followed by Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker with 12. James Cameron’s Avatar and Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones received 11 mentions apiece.

As usual, talent in small British films was bypassed in favor of those found in Hollywood productions. Up, Up in the Air, Star Trek, Gran Torino, A Serious Man, and Precious are a few other American films that received multiple mentions from the British Academy.

Despite excellent reviews in Cannes, Andrea Arnold’s Fish Tank isn’t up for best picture, nor is Jane Campion’s Bright Star. Out of 15 films in that category’s longlist, the only British entries are An Education and Duncan Jones’ Moon. District 9 has some South African financing, while all other best picture contenders are Hollywood productions to some extent or other.

At least, both Campion and Arnold are up for the best director BAFTA, along with Scherfig and Jones. The other potential candidates are those you’ve been seeing on critics’ lists in the United States, e.g., Jason Reitman (Up in the Air), Kathryn Bigelow, James Cameron, Quentin Tarantino.

Things get a little more international in the BAFTAs’ acting categories. Talent in non-Hollywood films include Ben Whishaw and Abbie Cornish (Bright Star, above), Carey Mulligan, Alfred Molina, Emma Thompson, and Dominic Cooper (An Education), Andy Serkis (Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll), Helen Mirren and Christopher Plummer (The Last Station), Michael Sheen and Timothy Spall (The Damned United), Penélope Cruz (Broken Embraces), Audrey Tautou (Coco Before Chanel), Anne-Marie Duff (Nowhere Boy), and Katie Jarvis (Fish Tank).

But where’s Michael Fassbender? He’s nowhere to be found for his work in Fish Tank, but Zachary Quinto is in there for Star Trek.

A few of us at Alt Film Guide have wondered why BAFTA hasn’t changed the name of their trophies to The Hollywood Europe Awards.

The BAFTA nominations will be announced on January 21. The BAFTA ceremony will take place on Feb. 21.

Photo: Apparition

BAFTA longlists

FILM
Avatar
District 9
An Education
Gran Torino
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Invictus
Moon
Precious
The Road
A Serious Man
A Single Man
Star Trek
Up
Up in the Air

DIRECTOR
Avatar
Bright Star
District 9
An Education
Fish Tank
Gran Torino
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Invictus
Moon
Precious
A Prophet
A Serious Man
Up
Up in the Air

ACTOR
Aaron Johnson (John Lennon) - Nowhere Boy
Andy Serkis (Ian Dury) - Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll
Ben Whishaw (John Keats) - Bright Star
Brad Pitt (Lt. Aldo Raine) - Inglourious Basterds
Clint Eastwood (Walt Kowalski) - Gran Torino
Colin Firth (George) - A Single Man
George Clooney (Ryan Bingham) - Up in the Air
Jeff Bridges (Bad Blake) - Crazy Heart
Jeremy Renner (William James) - The Hurt Locker
Michael Sheen (Brian Clough) - The Damned United
Morgan Freeman (Nelson Mandela) - Invictus
Peter Capaldi (Malcolm Tucker) - In the Loop
Peter Sarsgaard (David) - An Education
Sam Rockwell (Sam Bell) - Moon
Viggo Mortensen (Man) - The Road

ACTRESS
Abbie Cornish (Fanny Brawne) - Bright Star
Amy Adams (Julie Powell) - Julie and Julia
Audrey Tautou (Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel) - Coco Before Chanel
Carey Mulligan (Jenny) - An Education
Emily Blunt (Queen Victoria) - The Young Victoria
Gabourey Sidibe (Precious) - Precious
Helen Mirren (Sofya Tolstoy) - The Last Station
Katie Jarvis (Mia) - Fish Tank
Maggie Gyllenhaal (Jean Craddock) - Crazy Heart
Marion Cotillard (Luisa Contini) - Nine
Melanie Laurent (Shosanna Dreyfus) - Inglourious Basterds
Meryl Streep (Jane) - It’s Complicated
Meryl Streep (Julia Child) - Julie and Julia
Penélope Cruz (Lena) - Broken Embraces
Saoirse Ronan (Susie Salmon) - The Lovely Bones

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Aaron Wolff (Danny Gopnik) - A Serious Man
Alan Rickman (Professor Severus Snape) - Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Alec Baldwin (Jake) - It’s Complicated
Alfred Molina (Jack) - An Education
Anthony Mackie (J.T. Sanborn) - The Hurt Locker
Brian Geraghty (Owen Eldridge) - The Hurt Locker
Christian McKay (Orson Welles) - Me and Orson Welles
Christoph Waltz (Col. Landa) - Inglourious Basterds
Christopher Plummer (Leo Tolstoy) - The Last Station
Dominic Cooper (Danny) - An Education
Matt Damon (Francois Pienaar) - Invictus
Stanley Tucci (Mr Harvey) - The Lovely Bones
Stanley Tucci (Paul Child) - Julie & Julia
Timothy Spall (Peter Taylor) - The Damned United
Zachary Quinto (Spock) - Star Trek

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Anna Kendrick (Natalie Keener) - Up in the Air
Anne-Marie Duff (Julia) - Nowhere Boy
Claire Danes (Sonja Jones) - Me and Orson Welles
Diane Kruger (Bridget von Hammersmark) - Inglourious Basterds
Emma Thompson (Headmistress) - An Education
Julianne Moore (Charley) - A Single Man
Kristin Scott Thomas (Mimi) - Nowhere Boy
Mariah Carey (Mrs Weiss) - Precious
Mo’Nique (Mary) - Precious
Olivia Williams (Miss Stubbs) - An Education
Penélope Cruz (Carla) - Nine
Rachel Weisz (Abigail Salmon) - The Lovely Bones
Rosamund Pike (Helen) - An Education
Susan Sarandon (Grandma Lynn) - The Lovely Bones
Vera Farmiga (Alex Goran) - Up in the Air

Yvan Atall in Rapt
Yvan Atall in Rapt.

With 13 nods, Jacques Audiard’s prison drama A Prophet – one of the semi-finalists for this year’s best foreign language film Oscar, leads the 2010 Cesar Award nominations.

In addition to best film and best director mentions, A Prophet is also up for best actor and male newcomer (Tahar Rahim, with two nods), best supporting actor (Niels Arestrup), best male newcomer (Adel Bencherif), best screenplay (Audiard, Thomas Bidegain, Abdel Raouf Dafri, Nicolas Peufaillit), and best editing (Juliette Welfling).

The runners-up are Xavier Giannoli’s In the Beginning, the tale of a con man (best actor nominee François Cluzet) involved in the building of a road, with 11 nominations, and Phillipe Lioret’s immigrant drama Welcome, with 10. In the latter film, best actor nominee Vincent Lindon plays a swimming instructor who tries to help a Kurdish immigrant (best newcomer nominee Firat Ayverdi) swim across the Channel to meet his girlfriend in England.

The French government came forward to give Welcome lots of free publicity when immigration minister Éric Besson denounced both the film, which offers a sympathetic portrayal of an illegal immigrant, and director Lioret’s remarks comparing France’s immigration laws – five years in prison if you give assistance to an illegal immigrant – to those of the Vichy regime. “It has overstepped the bounds,” Besson was quoted as saying in L’Humanite, “to suggest that the French police are like those of Vichy, that the Afghans [sic] are hunted, and netted in raids, etc., is intolerable.” Welcome sold more than 1 million tickets in its first few weeks of release, and was the surprising best film winner at the Prix Lumiere ceremony on Jan. 15.

The other best picture nominees are Radu Mihaileanu’s The Concert, the story of a down-on-his-luck former conductor (Aleksei Guskov) of the Bolshoi orchestra who attempts to have a career resurgence in Paris with the assistance of a talented violinist (Mélanie Laurent); and Jean-Paul Lilienfeld’s Skirt Day, in which veteran Isabelle Adjani, following a six-year hiatus, returns to the big screen playing a teacher who gets really – but really – fed up with her rough, ethnic-minority students. For her efforts, Adjani earned a best actress nomination – following a Prix Lumiere win – and will probably take home her fifth Cesar.*

Also, 87-year-old Alain ResnaisWild Grass, which received raves at Cannes, about the budding relationship between a man (André Dussollier) who finds a wallet and the woman (Sabine Azéma) who had lost it; and Lucas Belvaux’s socially conscious psychological thriller Rapt, in which a powerful businessman (Yvan Attal) finds himself pretty powerless after he is kidnapped.

The six foreign film nominees are Danny Boyle’s Slumdog Millionaire, James Cameron’s Avatar, Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon, Gus Van Sant’s Milk, Stéphane Aubier and Vincent Patar’s animated Panique au village (Belgium), and Xavier Dolan’s I Killed My Mother.

The winners will be announced at Paris’ Theatre du Chatelet on Feb. 27.

* For the record: Adjani’s previous Césars were for Possession (1981), One Deadly Summer (1983), Camille Claudel (1988), and Queen Margot (1994).

The César winners will be announced on Feb. 27.

BEST FILM
A L’ORIGINE / IN THE BEGINNING, Edouard Weil and Pierre-Ange Le Pogam; directed by Xavier Giannoli
LE CONCERT / THE CONCERT, Alain Attal; directed by Radu Mihaileanu
LES HERBES FOLLES / WILD GRASS, Jean-Louis Livi; directed by Alain Resnais
LA JOURNÉE DE LA JUPE / SKIRT DAY, Bénédicte Lesage and Ariel Askénazi; directed by Jean-Paul Lilienfeld
RAPT, Patrick Sobelman, Diana Elbaum et Sébastien Delloye; directed by Lucas Belvaux
UN PROPHÈTE / A PROPHET, Pascal Caucheteux, Grégoire Sorlat et Marco Cherqui; directed by Jacques Audiard
WELCOME, Christophe Rossignon; directed by Philippe Liorand

BEST FOREIGN FILM
AVATAR; directed by James Cameron
GRAN TORINO; directed by Clint Eastwood
MILK; directed by Gus Van Sant
J’AI TUÉ MA MÈRE / I KILLED MY MOTHER; directed by Xavier Dolan
PANIQUE AU VILLAGE; directed by Stéphane Aubier and Vincent Patar
THE WHITE RIBBON; directed by Michael Haneke
SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE; directed by Danny Boyle

BEST DOCUMENTARY
L’ENFER D’ HENRI-GEORGES CLOUZOT; directed by Serge Bromberg and Ruxandra Medrea
LA DANSE, LE BALLET DE L’OPÉRA DE PARIS; directed by Frederick Wiseman
HIMALAYA, LE CHEMIN DU CIEL; directed by Marianne Chaud
HOME; directed by Yann-Arthus Bertrand
NE ME LIBÉREZ PAS JE M’EN CHARGE; directed by Fabienne Godet

BEST FIRST FILM
LES BEAUX GOSSES / THE FRENCH KISSERS; directed by Riad Sattouf, Anne-Dominique Toussaint
LE DERNIER POUR LA ROUTE / ONE FOR THE ROAD; directed by Philippe Godeau, Philippe Godeau
ESPION(S); directed by Nicolas Saada, Michaël Gentile
LA PREMIÈRE ÉTOILE; directed by Lucien Jean-Baptiste, Marie-Castille Mention-Schaar and Pierre Kubel
QU’UN SEUL TIENNE ET LES AUTRES SUIVRONT / SILENT VOICES; directed by Léa Fehner, Jean-Michel Rey and Philippe Liégeois

BEST DIRECTOR
JACQUES AUDIARD, A Prophet
LUCAS BELVAUX, Rapt
XAVIER GIANNOLI, In the Beginning
PHILIPPE LIORET, Welcome
RADU MIHAILEANU, The Concert

BEST ACTOR
YVAN ATTAL, Rapt
FRANÇOIS CLUZET, In the Beginning
FRANÇOIS CLUZET, Le dernier pour la route
VINCENT LINDON, Welcome
TAHAR RAHIM, A Prophet

BEST ACTRESS
ISABELLE ADJANI, Skirt Day
DOMINIQUE BLANC, LAutre / The Other One
SANDRINE KIBERLAIN, Mademoiselle Chambon
KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS, Partir / Leaving
AUDREY TAUTOU, Coco Before Chanel

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
JEAN-HUGUES ANGLADE, Persécution
NIELS ARESTRUP, A Prophet
JOEYSTARR, Le bal des actrices
BENOIT POELVOORDE, Coco Before Chanel
MICHEL VUILLERMOZ, Le dernier pour la route

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
AURE ATIKA, Mademoiselle Chambon
ANNE CONSIGNY, Rapt
AUDREY DANA, Welcome
EMMANUELLE DEVOS, In the Beginning
NOÉMIE LVOVSKY, Les beaux gosses

BEST MALE NEWCOMER
FIRAT AYVERDI, Welcome
ADEL BENCHERIF, A Prophet
VINCENT LACOSTE, Les beaux gosses
TAHAR RAHIM, A Prophet
VINCENT ROTTIERS, Je suis heureux que ma mère soit vivante

BEST FEMALE NEWCOMER
PAULINE ETIENNE, Qu’un seul tienne et les autres suivront
FLORENCE LOIRET-CAILLE, Je l’aimais
SOKO, In the Beginning
CHRISTA THÉRET, LOL (laughing out loud)
MÉLANIE THIERRY, Le dernier pour la route

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
JACQUES AUDIARD, THOMAS BIDEGAIN, ABDEL RAOUF DAFRI, NICOLAS PEUFAILLIT, A Prophet
XAVIER GIANNOLI, In the Beginning
JEAN-PAUL LILIENFELD, Skirt Day
PHILIPPE LIORET, EMMANUEL COURCOL, OLIVIER ADAM, Welcome
RADU MIHAILEANU, ALAIN-MICHEL BLANC, The Concert

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
STÉPHANE BRIZÉ, FLORENCE VIGNON, Mademoiselle Chambon
ANNE FONTAINE, CAMILLE FONTAINE pour Coco Before Chanel
PHILIPPE GODEAU, AGNÈS DE SACY, Le dernier pour la route
LAURENT TIRARD, GRÉGOIRE VIGNERON, Le petit Nicolas
ALEX RÉVAL, LAURENT HERBIET, Wild Grass

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
CHRISTOPHE BEAUCARNE, Coco Before Chanel
LAURENT DAILLAND, Welcome
STÉPHANE FONTAINE, A Prophet
ÉRIC GAUTIER, Wild Grass
GLYNN SPEECKAERT, In the Beginning

BEST EDITING
CÉLIA LAFITEDUPONT, In the Beginning
HERVÉ DE LUZE, Wild Grass
ANDRÉA SEDLACKOVA, Welcome
LUDO TROCH, The Concert
JULIETTE WELFLING, A Prophet

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
ARMAND AMAR, The Concert
ALEX BEAUPAIN, Non ma fille, tu n’iras pas danser
ALEXANDRE DESPLAT, A Prophet
CLIFF MARTINEZ, In the Beginning
NICOLA PIOVANI, Welcome

BEST ART DIRECTION
MICHEL BARTHÉLEMY, A Prophet
ALINE BONETTO, Micmacs à tire-larigot
MAAMAR ECH CHEIKH, OSS 117 Rio ne répond plus
FRANÇOIS-RENAUD LABARTHE, In the Beginning
OLIVIER RADOT, Coco Before Chanel

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
CHATTOUNE & FAB, Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
CHARLOTTE DAVID, OSS 117 Rio ne répond plus
MADELINE FONTAINE, Micmacs à tire-larigot
CATHERINE LETERRIER, Coco Before Chanel
VIRGINIE MONTEL, A Prophet

BEST SOUND
PIERRE EXCOFFIER, BRUNO TARRIÈRE, SÉLIM AZZAZI, The Concert
PIERRE MERTENS, LAURENT QUAGLIO, ERIC TISSERAND, Welcome
FRANÇOIS MUSY, GABRIEL HAFNER, In the Beginning
BRIGITTE TAILLANDIER, FRANCIS WARGNIER, JEAN-PAUL HURIER, A Prophet
JEAN UMANSKY, GÉRARD HARDY, VINCENT ARNARDI, Micmacs à tire-larigot

BEST SHORT
C’EST GRATUIT POUR LES FILLES; directed by Claire Burger and Marie Amachoukeli
¿DÓNDE ESTÁ KIM BASINGER?; directed by Edouard Deluc
LA RAISON DE L’AUTRE; directed by Foued Mansour
SÉANCE FAMILIALE; directed by Cheng-Chui Kuo
LES WILLIAMS; directed by Alban Mench

Photos: A Prophet (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics); Rapt (AGAT / RTBF), Welcome (Film Movement)

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yasbm -

what no sandra bullock . CraP to the BAFTA BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

We don’t care eligible. o man she did the best performance in the blind side lol putting other names wow just BRAVO BAFTA USELESS.

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