HomeMovie CraftsActors & ActressesCatharine Deneuve + Martin Scorsese Honors: Film Society of Lincoln Center + BAFTA Fellowship

Catharine Deneuve + Martin Scorsese Honors: Film Society of Lincoln Center + BAFTA Fellowship

Catherine Deneuve, 68, will be the recipient of the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s 39th Chaplin Award. The annual fundraising gala benefiting Lincoln Center programs will be held on Monday, April 2, at the Alice Tully Hall in New York. The evening will include films clips and a party. (Full list of Film Society of Lincoln Center (FSLC) Chaplin Award Honorees can be found further below.)

Catherine Deneuve’s career spans more than five decades, from André Hunebelle’s Les collégiennes / The Schoolgirls (1957), Jacques-Gérard Cornu’s L’homme à femmes / Ladies Man (1960), and Michel Fermaud and Jacques Poitrenaud’s Les Portes claquent / The Door Slams 1960) to her latest efforts: Christophe Honoré’s Les Biens-aimés / The Beloved, shown at last year’s Cannes Film Festival; Thierry Klifa’s Les Yeux de sa mère / His Mother’s Eyes; and Laurent Tirard’s upcoming Astérix et Obélix: Au Service de Sa Majesté / Astérix et Obélix: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, as Cordelia, the Queen of England, opposite frequent co-star Gérard Depardieu and Edouard Baer.

Deneuve became a star singing (with a dubbed voice) along with Nino Castelnuovo in Jacques Demy’s Palme d’Or-winning musical, Les Parapluies de Cherbourg / The Umbrellas of Cherbourg in 1964. Among her other notable 1960s films were Roman Polanski’s Repulsion (1965); Demy’s less successful follow-up musical Les Demoiselles de Rochefort / The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), in which Deneuve co-starred with her sister Françoise Dorleác, in addition to Danielle Darrieux, Gene Kelly, Jacques Perrin, and George Chakiris; Terence Young’s Mayerling (1968), with Omar Sharif; François Truffaut’s La Siréne du Mississippi / Mississippi Mermaid (1969), with Jean-Paul Belmondo; Stuart Rosenberg’s The April Fools (1969), with Jack Lemmon; and, most notably of all, as a housewife/sex worker in Luis Buñuel’s Belle de Jour (1967).

Deneuve’s career continued in full force throughout the ’70s and ’80s. Her movies included Buñuel’s Oscar-nominated Tristana (1970), with Fernando Rey; Demy’s fantasy musical Peau d’âne / Donkey Skin (1970), with Jacques Perrin; Jean-Pierre Melville’s Un Flic / Dirty Money (1971), with Alain Delon and Richard Crenna; and Robert Aldrich’s Hustle (1975), with Burt Reynolds.

Also, Truffaut’s Oscar-nominated Le Dernier Métro / The Last Metro (1980), co-starring with Gérard Depardieu, and for which she won the César Award for Best Actress; Claude Berri’s Je vous aime / I Love You All (1980), with Depardieu and Jean-Louis Trintignant; Tony Scott’s The Hunger (1983), with Susan Sarandon and David Bowie; and André Téchiné’s Le Lieu du crime / Scene of the Crime (1986), reunited with Danielle Darrieux.

In addition to winning her second César, Deneuve received her first (and so far only) Best Actress Academy Award nomination for her Southeast Asia plantation owner in Régis Wargnier’s Indochine (1992), with Vincent Perez. (Deneuve has been nominated for a total of 11 Prix César, including one nomination as Best Supporting Actress for Valérie Lemercier’s Palais royal!.)

Among Deneuve’s more than 40 films that followed Indochine are Manoel de Oliveira’s O Convento / The Convent (1995), with John Malkovich, plus two more by de Oliveira: Je rentre à la maison / I’m Going Home (2001) and Um Filme Falado / A Talking Picture (2003). Also, Nicole Garcia’s first-rate crime drama Place Vendôme (1998), with Jean-Pierre Bacri; Leos Carax’s controversial Pola X (1999), with Guillaume Depardieu; Lars von Trier’s Palme d’Or-winning musical Dancer in the Dark (2000), with Björk; and François Ozon’s brilliant murder-mystery-comedy-musical-melodrama 8 Femmes / 8 Women (2002), featuring Darrieux, Isabelle Huppert, and Fanny Ardant, among others.

More recently Deneuve could be seen in Arnaud Despléchin’s Un conte de Noël / A Christmas Tale (2008) and Ozon’s delightful comedy Potiche (2010), also featuring Depardieu. She could also be heard – along with daughter Chiara Mastroianni and Danielle Darrieux – in Vincent Paronnaud and Marjane Satrapi’s Academy Award-nominated Persepolis (2008), which caused a furor among radical Muslims when shown on Tunisian television a couple of months ago.

Previous winners of the Chaplin Award, first handed out in 1972 to Charles Chaplin himself, include Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, Laurence Olivier, Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Jane Fonda, Gregory Peck, Claudette Colbert, Elizabeth Taylor, Bette Davis, James Stewart, Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese, Diane Keaton, Michael Douglas, and Sidney Poitier.

Deneuve is only the fourth Chaplin Award recipient who hasn’t had an extensive Hollywood career. Her predecessors were Yves Montand (1988), Alec Guinness (1987), and Federico Fellini (1985).

Catherine Deneuve photo: Film Society of Lincoln Center

Charles Chaplin & Bette Davis + Meryl Streep: Film Society of Lincoln Center Chaplin Award Recipients

The Film Society of Lincoln Center’s annual fundraising gala began in 1972. It first honoree was Charles Chaplin, returning to the United States after two decades in exile. Since then, the award has been renamed for Chaplin.

That same year, Chaplin was saluted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with his second Honorary Oscar. The first such award for Chaplin had taken place 43 years earlier, at the very first Academy Awards ceremony in 1929. Chaplin, who won the award for directing, writing, and acting in The Circus, didn’t show up to get his booty the first time around. However, he was in attendance in 1972, when he was greeted with a long standing ovation.

As quoted in Mason Wiley and Damien Bona’s Inside Oscar, while looking for the places he used to know in Los Angeles, a dismayed Chaplin remarked: “It’s all banks, banks, banks!” Considering that right-wingers were reportedly planning to protest Chaplin’s appearance at the Oscars, the screen icon had to enter the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion through the theater’s underground gagage. (As an aside, had Chaplin returned to L.A. today, he’d probably have exclaimed, “It’s all stripmalls, stripmalls, stripmalls!”)

Below is the full list of Film Society of Lincoln Center Chaplin Award Honorees. As can be attested, the FSLC:

2012 Catherine Deneuve
2011 Sidney Poitier
2010 Michael Douglas
2009 Tom Hanks
2008 Meryl Streep
2007 Diane Keaton
2006 Jessica Lange
2005 Dustin Hoffman
2004 Michael Caine
2003 Susan Sarandon
2002 Francis Ford Coppola
2001 Jane Fonda
2000 Al Pacino
1999 Mike Nichols
1998 Martin Scorsese
1997 Sean Connery
1996 Clint Eastwood
1995 Shirley MacLaine
1994 Robert Altman
1993 Jack Lemmon
1992 Gregory Peck
1991 Audrey Hepburn
1990 James Stewart & Paul Newman
1989 Bette Davis
1988 Yves Montand
1987 Alec Guinness
1986 Elizabeth Taylor
1985 Federico Fellini
1984 Claudette Colbert
1983 Laurence Olivier
1982 Billy Wilder
1981 Barbara Stanwyck
1980 John Huston
1979 Bob Hope
1978 George Cukor
1975 Joanne Woodward
1974 Alfred Hitchcock
1973 Fred Astaire
1972 Charles Chaplin

Director Martin Scorsese: BAFTA Fellowship honoree.

Martin Scorsese to receive British Academy Fellowship

Next February (2012), Martin Scorsese will be honored with the British Academy of Film and Television Arts’ Fellowship, “the highest accolade bestowed upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film.”

British Academy Chairman Tim Corrie was quoted as saying in the BAFTA press release that “Martin Scorsese is a legend in his lifetime; a true inspiration to all young directors the world over. We are delighted to honour his contribution to cinema history and look forward to paying tribute to him in London on 12 February.”

The information below is from the BAFTA press release:

With a celebrated career now spanning six decades, Martin Scorsese is one of the most influential filmmakers in cinema history. The acclaimed director, producer and screenwriter has been nominated by BAFTA no fewer than nine times, garnering three wins in 1991 for Goodfellas. A cinematic master, his works also include Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Casino, Gangs of New York, The Aviator and The Departed. He has continued to delight critics and audiences alike with his most recent work, Hugo, a film that not only marks the director’s first foray into 3D but is also his first adventure film for all the family. Scorsese has also made a number of ground-breaking documentaries including celebrated music films No Direction Home: Bob Dylan, Shine a Light and George Harrison: Living in the Material World.

Demonstrating his passion for film preservation, Scorsese is the founder and chair of two non-profit organizations dedicated to the preservation and protection of motion picture history: The Film Foundation and the World Cinema Foundation.

The BAFTA release adds that back in December 2010 Scorsese was the subject of a ‘BAFTA: A Life in Pictures’ event, during which “he shared personal insights into his career and his craft and gave invaluable advice to newcomers to the industry.” You can watch Scorsese providing invaluable advice at www.bafta.org/guru.

Martin Scorsese BAFTA Film Award nominations

To date, Martin Scorsese has been shortlisted for seven Best Director BAFTA Awards, winning once – for Goodfellas, for which he also took home BAFTAs as the film’s co-producer (with Irwin Winkler) and co-screenwriter (with Nicholas Pileggi).

Here are Scorsese’s six other Best Director (film) nominations (followed by the year of the BAFTA ceremony):

  • The Departed (2007).
    Winner: Paul Greengrass for United 93.
  • The Aviator (2005).
    Winner: Mike Leigh for Vera Drake.
  • Gangs of New York (2003).
    Winner: Roman Polanski for The Pianist.
  • The King of Comedy (1984).
    Winner: Bill Forsyth for Local Hero.
  • Taxi Driver (1977).
    Winner:Milos Forman for One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.
  • Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (1976).
    Winner: Stanley Kubrick for Barry Lyndon.

Additionally, Scorsese has been nominated for two BAFTA TV Awards:

  • Boardwalk Empire (2011).
  • No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005; shared with Nigel Sinclair and Anthony Wall).

Mostly male, British/American BAFTA Fellows

Previous BAFTA (film/TV/video games) Fellowship recipients – an overwhelmingly male, British/American group of honorees – include the following:

Alfred Hitchcock. Sean Connery. Elizabeth Taylor. Stanley Kubrick. Jeanne Moreau. Vanessa Redgrave. Julie Christie. Ingmar Bergman. Steven Spielberg.

Anthony Hopkins. Laurence Olivier. Judi Dench. Charles Chaplin. David Lean. Alec Guinness. Fred Zinnemann. Federico Fellini. Richard Attenborough.

Christopher Lee became a Fellow last February.

The nominations for the Orange British Academy Film Awards will be announced on Tuesday, Jan. 17.

Broadcast by the BBC in the U.K., the ceremony will be held on Feb. 12. Stephen Fry will host the proceedings.

 

Martin Scorsese photo: BAFTA.

Natalie Portman & Reese Witherspoon: Golden Globes Presenters

The Dark Knight Rises’ Tom Hardy, Water for Elephants’ Reese Witherspoon, Star Trek‘s Chris Pine in McG’s This Means War

Last year’s Best Actress - Drama Golden Globe winner for Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan, Natalie Portman, will be a presenter at this year’s Golden Globes ceremony hosted by Ricky Gervais. Other announced 2012 Globes presenters are Portman’s fellow Black Swan ballerina Mila Kunis, Bridesmaids’ Melissa McCarthy, Source Code‘s Jake Gyllenhaal, Nicole Kidman, Freida Pinto, Clive Owen, and Goya Award nominees Salma Hayek and Antonio Banderas.

Also: Jimmy Fallon, Ashton Kutcher, Mark Wahlberg, Robert Downey Jr., Reese Witherspoon, Michelle Pfeiffer, Adam Levine, Rob Lowe, Katharine McPhee, and Jessica Biel. Wahlberg, Biel, and Witherspoon are three presenters with movie releases coming up: Wahlberg has Contraband; Biel has Playing the Field; and Witherspoon has This Means War.

The 69th Golden Globes will air live on NBC at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT on Sunday, January 15.

Tom Hardy/Reese Witherspoon/Chris Pine/This Means War photo: Kimberley French / 20th Century Fox.

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