Home Movie NewsBox Office ‘Harry Potter Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ Dethrones ‘Twilight’ Movies & Russell Crowe Has Decade’s 2nd-Worst Debut

‘Harry Potter Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ Dethrones ‘Twilight’ Movies & Russell Crowe Has Decade’s 2nd-Worst Debut

Burlesque Cher: Golden Globe nominee Best Motion Picture Comedy or MusicalBurlesque with Cher. Steven Antin’s eventual Golden Globe nominee has enjoyed a relatively modest run at the domestic box office. Burlesque – along with The Tourist – is in the running in the Best Motion Picture Comedy or Musical category.

‘Burlesque’ + ‘Love & Other Drugs’ fading away

Next in line was the $55 million-budgeted Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque, with $3.16 million at no. 7. Also in the cast:

Eric Dane. Julianne Hough. Alan Cumming. Peter Gallagher. Kristen Bell. Stanley Tucci. Dianna Agron. Tyne Stecklein.

Twilight vampire Cam Gigandet (Kristen Stewart almost becomes his lunch at one point).

Veteran James Brolin (Skyjacked, Westworld).


Harry Potter Deathly Hallows: Part 1 with Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson.

Dec. 3 update: Featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Ralph Fiennes, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Imelda Staunton, Richard Griffiths, Timothy Spall, and many others, David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 was the no. 1 movie at the U.S. and Canada box office on Thursday, Dec. 2. Warner Bros.’ adventure fantasy scored $1.89 million according to Box Office Mojo.

Deathly Hallows has remained on top all week in North America. But will it be overtaken by Disney’s animated 3D feature Tangled this weekend? At EW, John Young expects Tangled to earn about $6 million more than Harry Potter over the next couple of days. There won’t be much competition out there. The only major release opening today is The Warrior’s Way, which isn’t expect to create much of a stir at the box office.

At no. 2 on Thursday, Tangled pulled in $1.42 million, followed by the Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque with $825,000 at no. 3.

The no. 4 movie was Edward Zwick’s romantic comedy-drama Love and Other Drugs, starring Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal, which drew $728,000.

At no. 5, Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, took in $546,000.

Next in line were Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton’s Faster with $483,000 at no. 6 and Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, with $448,000 at no. 7.

DreamWorks’ Megamind grossed $333,000 at no. 8.

Rounding out the top twelve were Paul Haggis-Russell Crowe’s The Next Three Days with $302,000, Harrison Ford-Diane Keaton-Rachel McAdamsMorning Glory with $231,000, Danny Boyle-James Franco’s 127 Hours with $142,000, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $84,000.

Among the top-twelve movies, 127 Hours had the highest per-theater average, $487. Morning Glory had the lowest, $95.

Also among the top twelve, four movies posted attendance increases, with Tangled at the top following a modest 5 percent Wednesday-to-Thursday bump. Fair Game posted the highest drop-off rate, down 9.7 percent.

Photo: Warner Bros.

Dec. 1

Featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Imelda Staunton, Miranda Richardson, and many others, David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 topped the North American box office once again on Tuesday, Nov. 30. Warner Bros.’ fantasy adventure brought in $2.27 million.

At no. 2 was Disney’s animated 3D feature Tangled with $1.69 million, followed by the Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque with $1.03 million at no. 3 – back above the $1m-per-day mark after grossing only $876k on Monday.

The no. 4 movie was Edward Zwick’s romantic comedy-drama Love and Other Drugs, starring Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal, which took in $856,000.

At no. 5, Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton’s Faster pulled in $675,000.

Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, scored $665,000 at no. 6, while Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, collected $503,000 at no. 7.

Next in line was Paul Haggis-Russell Crowe’s The Next Three Days with $399,000.

Rounding out the top twelve were DreamWorks’ Megamind with $382,000, Harrison Ford-Diane Keaton-Rachel McAdams’ Morning Glory with $292,000, Danny Boyle-James Franco’s 127 Hours with $156,000, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $107,000.

Among the top-twelve movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 had the highest per-theater average, $552. Megamind had the lowest, $112.

Also among the top twelve, nine movies posted attendance increases, with Morning Glory at the top, having jumped 27.3 percent.

Megamind posted the highest drop-off rate from Monday, down 7.4 percent, after tumbling 83.3 percent that day.

Photo: Warner Bros.

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Colin Firth, The King’s Speech

Featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Imelda Staunton, Miranda Richardson, and many other well-known British actors, David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 topped the North American box office this past weekend (Nov. 26-28), pulling in $49.08 million – over $1 million less than Sunday estimates – according to weekend actuals found at Box Office Mojo.

At no. 2 was Disney’s animated 3D feature Tangled, which brought in $48.76 million. At least partly thanks to 3D surcharges and 2010’s higher ticket prices, Tangled had the second biggest Thanksgiving opening ever.

At a distant no. 3, DreamWorks’ animated 3D feature Megamind, with the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt, drew $12.57 million.

At no. 4, the Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque scored $11.94 million, followed by Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, with $11.43 million at no. 5.

The no. 6 movie was Edward Zwick’s romantic comedy-drama Love and Other Drugs, starring Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal, which grossed $9.73 million.

Next in line were Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton’s Faster with $8.52 million at no. 7 and Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, with $7.16 million at no. 8.

Rounding out the top twelve were Paul Haggis-Russell Crowe’s The Next Three Days with $4.68 million, Harrison Ford-Diane Keaton-Rachel McAdams’ Morning Glory with $3.91 million, Danny Boyle-James Franco’s 127 Hours with $1.7 million, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $1.56 million.

Among the top-twelve movies, Tangled — thanks to 3D surcharges – had the highest per-theater average, $13,535. Morning Glory had the lowest, $1,602.

At only 4 theaters, The King’s Speech, starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush, took in $355,000, thus scoring the year’s highest per-theater average: $88,863.

Also among the top twelve (barring mid-week entries Burlesque, Love and Other Drugs, Tangled, and Faster; and the expanded 127 Hours), Fair Game was the only movie to go up compared to last weekend, up 7.2 percent, following the addition of 10 theaters.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 posted the highest drop-off rate from last weekend, down 60.7 percent (or about down 51 percent if Thursday midnight screenings are removed from last weekend’s total).

Photo: The Weinstein Co.

Nov. 28

Stanley Tucci, Cher, Burlesque
Stanley Tucci, Cher in Steven Antin’s Burlesque

Right on the heels of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 was Disney’s animated 3D feature Tangled, which brought in an estimated $49.1 million at 3,603 sites in North America.

Thanks to 3D surcharges, Tangled‘s per-theater weekend average was higher than Harry Potter‘s: $13,628 vs. $12,205 (at 4,125 locations).

Directed by Nathan Greno and Byron Howard, Tangled has scored $69 million since its Wednesday opening – and it’s actually expected to top the U.S. and Canada box office today. Tangled‘s budget lay somewhere between $150-200 million.

At a distant no. 3, DreamWorks’ animated 3D Megamind, featuring the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt, collected $12.85 million (down 19.8 percent). Total: $130.46 million. Cost: $130 million.

At no. 4, the Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque earned $11.8 million, averaging a disappointing $3,885 at 3,037 sites. Burlesque‘s five-day Thanksgiving weekend total was a modest $17.15 million.

There’s no way Burlesque will be able to recover its reported $60 million budget (not including distribution/marketing costs) at the domestic box office.

At no. 5, Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, collected $11.75 million, down only 9.7 percent from last weekend. It’s possible that Burlesque and Unstoppable will reverse positions when box office actuals are released on Monday.

Unstoppable, which cost $100m, has underperformed despite the many good reviews. Total after 17 days: $60.72 million.

Compounding matters, Unstoppable hasn’t been doing all that great overseas, where it’s taken in only $42.92 million. That’s not surprising, as Denzel Washington’s vehicles tend to perform better domestically than abroad and hardly ever pass the $100 million milestone internationally (American Gangster was a notable exception).

Photo: Burlesque (Stephen Vaughn / Sony Pictures)

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Cher, Christina Aguilera, Burlesque

Cher, Christina Aguilera in Steven Antin’s Burlesque (top); Anne Hathaway, Jake Gyllenhaal in Edward Zwick’s Love and Other Drugs (bottom)

Following Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and Tangled, animated 3D holdover Megamind, featuring the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt, earned $5.25 million at a distant no. 3, according to studio estimates found at Box Office Mojo.

At no. 4, Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, collected $4.57 million. Unstoppable, which cost $100m, has performed rather languidly at the domestic box office. The generally well-received action-drama has taken in only $53.55 million after 15 days.

At no. 5, the Cher-Christina Aguilera musical Burlesque earned a so-so $4.5 million, averaging $1,482 at 3,037 sites. Its five-day Thanksgiving weekend total will at best match Sony’s very conservative estimates of $17-18 million. Total after three days: $9.85 million.

At no. 6 was another new entry that also failed to set the domestic box office on fire: Edward Zwick’s romantic comedy drama Love and Other Drugs, which stars Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal. Love and Other Drugs pulled in only $3.8 million at 2,455 sites, averaging a modest $1,548 per theater. Total since Wednesday: $7.95 million.

Performing even more sluggishly was CBS Films’ ironically titled Faster, starring Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton. Faster scored only $3.22 million at 2,454 locations on Friday for a three-day total of $6.71 million. Its Friday average was only $1,315 per site.

Next in line was Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, which drew $2.85 million at no. 8.

Rounding out the top twelve were Paul Haggis-Russell Crowe’s The Next Three Days with $1.8m, Harrison Ford-Diane Keaton-Rachel McAdams’ Morning Glory with $1.59 million, Danny Boyle-James Franco’s 127 Hours with $656,000, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $595,000.

Gone from last weekend’s top-twelve were Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s Skyline, Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red, Tyler Perry-Janet Jackson-Whoopi Goldberg’s For Colored Girls, Diane Lane-John Malkovich’s Secretariat, and Tod WilliamsParanormal Activity 2.

Among the top-twelve movies, Tangled — thanks to 3D surcharges – had the highest per-theater average, $5,468. Morning Glory had the lowest, $653.

Also among the top twelve, Fair Game posted the highest Thursday-to-Friday attendance-increase rate, up 174.2 percent. Due Date posted the lowest, up 63.8 percent.

Photo: Burlesque (Stephen Vaughn / Sony Pictures); Love and Other Drugs (20th Century Fox)

Colin Firth, The King's Speech
Colin Firth, The King’s Speech

At only 4 theaters, The King’s Speech, the Oscar-buzzed historical comedy-drama starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush, scored a whopping $350,000 this weekend in North America, as per studio estimates.

Directed by Tom Hooper, and featuring Guy Pearce, Helena Bonham Carter, Michael Gambon, Timothy Spall, and Derek Jacobi, The King’s Speech averaged $87,500 per site.

If studio estimates hold, The King’s Speech will have beaten the 2010 record of Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right, which opened at 7 theaters earlier in the year, averaging $70,282 per location.

Now, it’s worth remembering that when we’re discussing such small number of theaters, it makes a huge difference when you go from 4 to 7 theaters. That’s nearly double the amount. All things being equal, the lower the number of theaters, the higher the per-theater average should be.

Photo: The Weinstein Co.

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Jake Gyllenhaal, Anne Hathaway in Edward Zwick’s Love and Other Drugs

 

At no. 6 at the domestic box office was Edward Zwick’s romantic comedy-drama Love and Other Drugs, which pulled in only $9.85 million at 2,455 sites, averaging a modest $4,012 per theater according to studio estimates found at Box Office Mojo. Total since Wednesday: $14 million. Cost: a reported $30 million.

Love and Other Drugs stars Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal, and features Oliver Platt, Hank Azaria, Judy Greer, and the recently deceased Jill Clayburgh in one of her last screen appearances.

At no. 7, Faster, starring Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton, drew a sluggish $8.7 million at 2,454 locations for a five-day total of $12.2 million. Its per-theater average was a weak $3,548. The action-drama will have trouble matching its low $24 million budget at the domestic box office.

Next in line was Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, which collected $7.3 million (down 18.1 percent) at no. 8. Total: $85.01 million. Cost: $65 million.

Rounding out the top twelve were:

  • Paul Haggis-Russell Crowe’s The Next Three Days with $4.84 million (down 26 percent). Total: $14.55 million. Cost: $30 million.
  • Harrison Ford-Diane Keaton-Rachel McAdams’ Morning Glory with $4.03 million (down 22.5 percent). Total: $26.45 million. Cost: $40 million.
  • Danny Boyle-James Franco’s 127 Hours with $1.72 million (+88.2 percent, after nearly tripling its number of theaters). Total: $4.41 million. Cost: $18 million.
  • Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $1.58 million (+8.7 percent). Total: $5.97 million. Cost: $22 million.

Both 127 Hours and Fair Game still have some room for a wider expansion, especially now with awards season close at hand. However, it seems unlikely that either one will go and/or stay wide for very long unless they generate a whole lot of Oscar buzz. Their respective per-theater averages this weekend were an estimated $5,887 (at 293 sites) and $3,997 (at 396 sites) – neither of which is what one would call stellar.

Gone from last weekend’s top-twelve were Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s Skyline, Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red, Tyler Perry-Janet Jackson-Whoopi Goldberg’s For Colored Girls, Diane Lane-John Malkovich’s Secretariat, and Tod Williams’ Paranormal Activity 2.

Among the top-twelve movies, Tangled — thanks to 3D surcharges – had the highest per-theater average, $13,628. Morning Glory had the lowest, $1,651.

Also among the top twelve (barring mid-week entries Burlesque, Love and Other Drugs, Tangled, and Faster; and the expanded 127 Hours), Fair Game was the only movie that posted an attendance increase compared to last weekend, up 8.7 percent following the addition of 10 venues.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 posted the highest drop-off rate from last weekend, down 59.7 percent (or about down 50 percent if Thursday midnight screenings are removed from last weekend’s total).

Photo: Love and Other Drugs (20th Century Fox)

Nov. 27


Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort in David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Imelda Staunton, Miranda Richardson, and many other renowned British performers, Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 topped the North American box office for the second weekend in a row (Nov. 26-28), collecting $50.34 million as per studio estimates.

The David Yates-directed adventure fantasy was down approximately 50 percent from last weekend (not including last week’s Thursday midnight screenings), partly because Harry Potter blew some box office steam throughout Thanksgiving week in the United States.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 passed the $200 million milestone on Saturday. Total after 10 days: $220.35 million.

It should be noted that according to studio estimates, Harry Potter was actually the no. 2 movie on Sunday. Disney’s surprising (major) hit Tangled, a revamped version of the Rapunzel tale, will take in an estimated $25k more than Deathly Hallows today.

Overseas, the latest Harry Potter – which topped the international box office for the second weekend in a row – has grossed an estimated $389.2 million. Top markets are the United Kingdom with $53.5 million, Germany with $36.8 million, Japan with $34.8 million, and Australia with $25.1 million.

Also, according to The Hollywood Reporter Deathly Hallows pulled in $19.1 million on its debut weekend in France.

International grosses currently represent 63.9 percent of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1‘s total take. Overseas markets, in fact, have allowed Warner Bros. to spend $200 million making the latest Harry Potter installment.

Deathly Hallows’ current worldwide total: $609.55 million.

Photo: Warner Bros.

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Rapunzel (Mandy Moore), Flynn Rider (Zachary Levi), Tangled

Featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Miranda Richardson, Imelda Staunton, and many others, Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 took in $20.7 million at the North American box office on Friday according to studio estimates.

The David Yates-directed adventure fantasy was down 45 percent from a week ago (not including last week’s Thursday midnight screenings). Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 will pass the $200 million milestone some time today. Total to date: $190.75 million.

Not very far behind, at no. 2 was Disney’s Tangled, a newfangled 3D look at the Rapunzel tale, which grossed an estimated $19.7 million at 3,603 sites. In fact, thanks to 3D surcharges Tangled‘s per-theater Friday average was higher than Harry Potter‘s: $5,468 vs. $5,030 (at 4,125 locations).

Directed by Nathan Greno and Byron Howard, Tangled has amassed $39.75 million since its Wednesday opening.

Photo: Disney Enterprises.

Nov. 22

Directed by David Yates, and featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, Miranda Richardson, Imelda Staunton, and many others, Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 collected $125.01 million – about $500,000 less than Sunday estimates – at the U.S. and Canada box office according to weekend actuals.

At no. 2, Megamind, featuring the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt, earned $16.01 million. It was followed by Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, with $13 million.

At no. 4, Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, brought in $8.91 million.

The Next Three Days, directed by Paul Haggis and starring Russell Crowe and Elizabeth Banks, drew $6.45 million at no. 5.

Roger Michell’s Morning Glory, starring Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, and Patrick Wilson, scored $5.2 million in sixth place.

Next in line were Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s low-budget sci-fier Skyline with $3.56 million and Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red with $2.48 million at no. 8.

Rounding out the top twelve were Tyler Perry-Janet Jackson-Whoopi Goldberg’s For Colored Girls with $2.29 million, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $1.45 million, Diane Lane-John Malkovich’s Secretariat with $971,000, Tod Williams’ Paranormal Activity 2 with $945,000.

Among the top-twelve movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 had the highest per-theater average, $30,307. Paranormal Activity 2 had the lowest, $859.

Also among the top twelve (barring new entries Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and The Next Three Days, and the expanded Fair Game), Skyline posted the steepest weekend-to-weekend drop-off rate, down 69.5 percent. Due Date posted the lowest, down 42.2 percent.

Photo: Warner Bros.


Helena Bonham Carter, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint; featuring just about every major British performer over 40; and directed by talent ranging from Chris Columbus to Alfonso Cuarón, the movie adaptations of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter novels have been a reliable box office staple for distributor Warner Bros.: to date the seven Harry Potter movies have grossed nearly $5.5 billion worldwide.

In North America, their opening-weekend grosses have usually ranged between 25-38 percent of each film’s total take. If that pattern holds, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, which pulled in $125 million on its debut weekend, should eventually collect between $325m-$500 million in the U.S. and Canada.

For comparison’s sake: starring Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, and Taylor Lautner, The Twilight Saga: New Moon brought in more than 48 percent of its final domestic gross on its debut weekend. The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, for its part, collected more than 52 percent of its total domestic take during its first five days out. (Eclipse opened on a Wednesday.)

Now, various news reports have claimed that Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 has outperformed all its predecessors on opening weekend. That is true only if you ignore inflation and IMAX surcharges.

However, if you factor in inflation – even while ignoring the IMAX ticket-price surcharges – then both Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001) had stronger debuts than Deathly Hallows: Part 1.

I’ve created a little chart that includes the opening-weekend and total box office grosses of the Harry Potter movies in North America.

Since I was unable to find specific IMAX data for the first few Harry Potter efforts, I left that variable off the chart.

Also, I opted not to include inflation-adjusted data for international grosses for three reasons:

  • Dollar-based international figures are misleading – when it comes to number of tickets sold – because if the dollar is low, international figures will be inflated; if it’s high, international figures will be lower even if the same number of tickets is sold.
  • There’s inflation in each country. Rates vary. Therefore it would be unworkable to try to figure out the adjusted-for-inflation box office take per country and then convert that into dollars.
  • The inflation-adjusted figures help you see which movies sold the highest number of tickets. The problem is that ticket prices vary widely from country to country. It would be a monumental task trying to figure out ticket prices per country when each Harry Potter movie came out so as to estimate the number of tickets sold internationally (while translating the amount collected into dollar figures).

Photo: Warner Bros.

The chart below was culled from figures found at Box Office Mojo. I’ve also used BOM’s inflation ratio to calculate 2010 grosses for the earlier Harry Potter movies.

The four most notable things about the inflation-adjusted chart are:

  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is no. 3 in number of tickets sold on opening weekend. It could be even further behind if IMAX surcharges were factored in.
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone remains – by far – the most popular movie in the franchise.
  • The Harry Potter movies that opened during the summer season were the weakest performers.
  • The number of tickets sold for each Harry Potter movie has – with a couple of exceptions – gone steadily down in the last nine years.

2010 inflation-adjusted figures in parentheses

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (November 19, 2010) $125,017,372
(#1 rank, 4,125 theaters, $30,307 average)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (July 15, 2009) $77,835,727 ($82,505.8m)
Total: $301,959,197 ($320,076.5m)
(#1 rank, 4,325 theaters, $17,997 average)
percent of Total Gross: 25.8%

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (July 11, 2007) $77,108,414 ($89,100.5m)
Total: $292,004,738 ($337,417.2 million)
(#1 rank, 4,285 theaters, $17,994 average)
percent of Total Gross: 26.4%

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (November 18, 2005) $102,685,961 ($127,356.1m)
Total: $290,013,036 ($359,691.2 million)
(#1 rank, 3,858 theaters, $26,616 average)
percent of Total Gross: 35.4%

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (June 4, 2004) $93,687,367 ($119,937.8m)
Total: $249,541,069 ($319,459.4m)
(#1 rank, 3,855 theaters, $24,302 average)
percent of Total Gross: 37.5%

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Nov. 15, 2002) $88,357,488 ($120,902.1m)
Total: $261,988,482 ($358,487.4m)
(#1 rank, 3,682 theaters, $23,997 average)
percent of Total Gross: 33.7%

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (November 16, 2001) $90,294,621 ($126,827.2 million)
Total: $317,575,550 ($446,066.1m)
(#1 rank, 3,672 theaters, $24,590 average)
percent of Total Gross: 28.4%

Photo: Warner Bros.

Nov. 21


Emma Watson, Julie Walters, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling’s bestseller, directed by David Yates, and featuring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Julie Walters, and many others, Warner Bros.’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 dominated the North American box office this weekend (Nov. 19-21), taking in $125.5 million – or about $5 million less than reported studio predictions and about $10m-$25 million less than some pundits had been expecting – according to estimates.

No major box office records were broken by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1: David Slade’s The Twilight Saga: Eclipse has retained the record for most profitable midnight screenings ($30 million vs. Deathly Hallows’ $24m); The Twilight Saga: New Moon has retained the record for best opening-day/single-day ($72.7 million vs. Deathly Hallows’ $61.1m); Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight has easily retained the record for most successful three-day opening weekend ever ($158.4m).

The next-to-last installment in the Harry Potter franchise, however, did beat the opening-weekend box office performance of all its predecessors. Well, as long as you toe the studio line and opt to ignore inflated ticket prices. More on that in an upcoming post.

Screening at 4,125 venues, Yates’ adventure-fantasy tale, which has a good but hardly outstanding 74 percent approval rating among Rotten Tomatoes’ top critics, collected an estimated $30,332 per location.

For comparison’s sake:

  • In March, prior to 2010’s steep ticket-price increase but with the advantage of 3D surcharges, Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland grossed $116.1 million, averaging $31,143 at 3,728 theaters.
  • Jon Favreau-Robert Downey Jr’s Iron Man 2 opened in June with $128.1 million in ticket sales at 4,380 sites, averaging $29,252 per theater.
  • Also in June, Lee Unkrich’s Toy Story 3 – the year’s most successful film to date (partly with the assistance of 3D surcharges) – grossed $110.3 million at 4,028 locations on its first weekend out, averaging $27,385 per site.

Also worthy of note: Deathly Hallows: Part 1 had only a very minor bump on Saturday when compared to Friday’s figures (minus midnight screenings), going from approximately $37.15 million on Friday to $38.22 million on Saturday.

That’s quite possibly why this latest Harry Potter failed to either meet or surpass expectations.

Overseas, where the Harry Potter films tend to perform more strongly than in the U.S. and Canada, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 opened with $28 million opening in the United Kingdom, $21.8 million in Germany, $14.8 million in Australia, $14 million in Japan, and $12.3 million in Russia. The film’s total after five days is $205 million according to The Hollywood Reporter, second to Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince‘s $236 million at a similar number of screens/territories last year.

Photo: Warner Bros.

Nov. 21


Elizabeth Banks, Russell Crowe in Paul Haggis’ The Next Three Days

Despite Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1‘s heavy-duty opening-weekend take, North American box office receipts (an estimated $197m) were down a whopping 24 percent (not factoring in inflation, which would make things look even worse) when compared to the same weekend last year.

That weekend boasted the Kristen Stewart-Robert Pattinson-Taylor Lautner vehicle The Twilight Saga: New Moon ($142.8m) and Sandra Bullock’s sleeper blockbuster The Blind Side ($34.1m).

Back to this weekend: The no. 2 movie in North America, following David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, was DreamWorks’ animated 3D feature Megamind, starring the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt.

Megamind earned $16.17 million (down a relatively steep down 44.7 percent), having thus passed the $100 million milestone according to studio estimates found at Box Office Mojo. Total to date: $109.47 million. Cost: $130 million.

Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, collected $13.1 million (down 42.3 percent) in third place. Total: $41.96 million. Cost: $100 million.

At no. 4, Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, grossed $9.15 million (down 40.7 percent). Total: $72.66 million. Cost: $65 million.

New entry The Next Three Days, directed by Crash‘s Oscar-winning screenwriter Paul Haggis and starring Russell Crowe, brought in a dismal $6.75 million at no. 5, averaging only $2,633 per-theater at 2,564 locations.

Poorly received by film reviewers – 38 percent approval rating among Rotten Tomatoes‘ top critics – The Next Three Days had Russell Crowe’s second-worst (wide) opening weekend figure in the last 10 years. Only A Good Year fared worse, taking in $3.72 million in 2006.

And if inflation is factored in, The Next Three Days’ take looks even paltrier when compared to Crowe’s movies of the last 15 years or so.

Roger Michell’s Morning Glory, starring Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, and Patrick Wilson, collected $5.23 million (down 43.1 percent) in sixth place. Total: $19.85 million. Cost: $40 million.

Next in line was Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s low-budget sci-fier Skyline with $3.43 million, down an alarming down 70.7 percent, at no. 7. Total: $17.64 million. Cost: $10 million.

Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red took in $2.46 million (down 50.4 percent after losing nearly 850 theaters) at no. 8. Total: $83.57 million. Cost: $58 million.

Rounding out the top twelve were:

  • Tyler Perry-Janet Jackson-Whoopi Goldberg’s For Colored Girls, which is going down just as fast as (if not faster than) Perry’s comedies, with $2.4 million (down 63.2 percent). Total: $34.54 million. Cost: $21 million.
  • Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $1.47 million (+44 percent, after more than doubling its number of screens). Fair Game‘s per-theater average was a not very impressive $3,808 per location. That means the well-received political thriller’s expansion probably won’t get very wide – and even if it does, its wide release shouldn’t be very lasting. Total: $3.73 million. Cost: $22 million.
  • Diane Lane-John Malkovich’s Secretariat with $962k (-56.4 percent). Total: $56.36 million. Cost: $35 million.
  • Tod Williams’ Paranormal Activity 2 with $926k (-68.9 percent). Total: $83.56 million. Cost: $3 million (in addition to at least $24 million in marketing expenses).

Gone from the top twelve were Saw 3D, Johnny Knoxville’s Jackass 3D, and David Fincher-Jesse Eisenberg-Justin Timberlake’s The Social Network.

Among the top-twelve movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 had the highest per-theater average, $30,332. Paranormal Activity 2 had the lowest, $841.

Also among the top twelve (barring new entries Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and The Next Three Days, and the expanded Fair Game), Skyline posted the steepest weekend-to-weekend drop-off rate, down 70.7 percent. Due Date posted the lowest, down 40.7 percent.

Photo: The Next Three Days (Phil Caruso / Lionsgate)

Nov. 20


Bonnie Wright, Daniel Radcliffe, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Directed by David Yates, adapted by Steve Kloves from J.K. Rowling’s novel, and starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, the eagerly awaited Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, the next-to-last installment in the Harry Potter franchise, opened to the tune of $61.15 million in the U.S. and Canada on Friday, Nov. 19, thus not only topping the North American box office but also representing most of it, according to studio estimates.

I mean, the no. 2 movie, Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Star Trek‘s Chris Pine and Oscar winner Denzel Washington, came to a grinding halt – or at least it looked like it did if compared to Deathly Hallows – taking in $4.07 million, or less than one tenth of the Harry Potter gross.

Yates’ adventure-fantasy flick, which has received on average just a lukewarm response from critics, collected an outstanding $14,824 per location (4,125 of them) – even without 3D surcharges. (Though IMAX surcharges did very much apply at more than 350 sites.)

That’s the good Harry Potter news. The less than good news is that despite all the buzz, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 will simply not smash all sorts of box office records.

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse has retained the box office record for most profitable midnight screenings ($30 million vs. Deathly Hallows’ $24 million), while The Twilight Saga: New Moon has easily retained the record for best opening-day/single-day ($72.7m).

In that category, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is no. 5, after New Moon, Eclipse, The Dark Knight, and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.

And there’s basically no chance Deathly Hallows will get even near to the weekend take of either The Dark Knight ($158.4m) or Spider-Man 3 ($151.1m). Well, barring a miracle, that is.

True enough, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 has surpassed the opening-day take of the previous Harry Potter record holder, last year’s Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince – but, if studio estimates for Deathly Hallows are correct, only if you choose to ignore ticket-price increases.

Adjusted for inflation (using Box Office Mojo’s 2010 “average”), Half-Blood Prince would have collected 62.02 million were it to open in fall 2010.

Are the suits at Warner Bros. weeping copiously? I doubt it – though I’m sure they wish their movie had smashed records left and right.

As for Harry Potter being the most successful movie franchise ever … Well, apart from cheaply made horror flicks (Saw and its six children), how many 7-movie franchises have there been in this past decade of inflated ticket prices?

Photo: Warner Bros.

Previous post


Rupert Grint, Daniel Radcliffe, Dobby (voiced by Toby Jones), Kreacher (voice by Simon McBurney), Emma Watson, Andy Linden in David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 bagged approximately $64 million at the North American box office on Friday – including $24 million from midnight/3 a.m. screenings – according to early, rough estimates found at Deadline.com.

That means Kristen Stewart-Robert Pattinson-Taylor Lautner’s The Twilight Saga: New Moon‘s opening-day (and single-day) record remains intact, much like the vampire-human-werewolf trio’s The Twilight Saga: Eclipse‘s midnight screenings remain the most profitable ever (not adjusted for inflation) even though the latest Harry Potter installment opened at many more theaters – a record-setting 3,700 sites or whereabouts.

Directed by David Yates, and starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Ralph Fiennes, Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is expected to take in anywhere between $130m-$150m+ this weekend.

Both The Dark Knight and Spider-Man 3 should be able to keep their place as the top two three-day-weekend grossers ever (not adjusted for inflation). But Deathly Hallows: Part 1 may land in third place.

Remember, those are early, rough estimates. Official studio estimates will come out on Saturday morning. Actuals will be released on Monday.

Figures may change quite a bit between now and Monday. For instance, Iron Man 2‘s weekend take was down $5 million by the time Monday’s actuals were announced.

Photo: Warner Bros.


Russell Crowe in Paul Haggis’ The Next Three Days

Following David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, Megamind earned $3.73 million at the North American box office on Friday, Nov. 19, as per studio estimates.

Megamind features the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt. DreamWorks’ animated 3D feature will be passing the $100 million milestone some time today.

At no. 4, Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, grossed $2.92 million.

New entry The Next Three Days, directed by Crash screenwriter Paul Haggis and starring Russell Crowe, took in $2.2 million at no. 5, averaging only $858 per-theater at 2,564 locations.

In all probability, The Next Three Days will end the weekend way short of the $10 million mark, thus becoming one more domestic box office disappointment on Russell Crowe’s cap, following Robin Hood, Body of Lies, State of Play, 3:10 to Yuma, A Good Year, and Cinderella Man.

In the last five years, the only Crowe vehicle that performed above expectations was American Gangster, which collected $130.1 million in 2007.

Roger Michell’s Morning Glory, starring Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, and Patrick Wilson, collected $1.61 million in sixth place.

Next in line were Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s low-budget sci-fier Skyline with $1.06 million at no. 7, and Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red with $720,000 at no. 8.

Rounding out the top twelve were Tyler Perry-Janet Jackson-Whoopi Goldberg’s For Colored Girls with $675,000, Naomi Watts-Sean Penn’s Fair Game with $375k (with a not very impressive $972 per-theater average at only 386 locations), Tod Williams’ Paranormal Activity 2 with $299,000, Diane Lane’s Secretariat with $264,000.

Gone from the top twelve were Saw 3D, Johnny Knoxville’s Jackass 3D, and David Fincher-Jesse Eisenberg-Justin Timberlake’s The Social Network.

Among the top-twelve movies, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 had the highest per-theater average, $14,824. Secretariat had the lowest, $261.

Also among the top twelve (barring new entries Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and The Next Three Days), after losing about half its theaters Secretariat posted the lowest Thursday-to-Friday attendance increase, up 60.2 percent. Following the addition of more than 200 sites (more than doubling its exposure), Fair Game posted the highest, up 340.5 percent.

Photo: The Next Three Days (Phil Caruso / Lionsgate)

Nov. 19


Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint fans were no match for those of Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, and Taylor Lautner.

David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, which opened at midnight Thursday, grossed $24 million in North America. That’s a lot of money for midnight screenings – but not enough to surpass the box office take of either The Twilight Saga: New Moon ($26.3m) last fall or The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ($30m) this past summer.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 thus gets the bronze medal of midnight shows.

Unless there’s a major surge on Friday and Saturday, it seems highly unlikely that this latest Harry Potter will get even close to breaking The Dark Knight‘s opening weekend record ($158.4m) or even New Moon‘s opening-day record ($72.7m). On Thursday, some pundits had been considering the possibility of a record-smashing opening for Death Hallows: Part I.

The good news: Deathly Hallows: Part 1 performed better than last year’s Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which collected $22.2 million from midnight shows.

Photo: Warner Bros.

Chris Pine, Unstoppable, Tony Scott
Chris Pine in Tony Scott’s Unstoppable

The North American box office was down across the board – for the second day in a row – on Thursday, Nov. 18. The top ten movies were down nearly 8 percent from Wednesday and a whopping 69.4 percent from the previous Thursday, according to figures.

Tony Scott’s Unstoppable, starring Chris Pine and Denzel Washington, topped the limping box office chart for the fourth consecutive day – its last as well – collecting $1.34 million.

Friday brings Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, which will be this coming weekend’s one saving grace in terms of attendance figures.

Unstoppable should lose quite a bit of steam after an already underwhelming opening, while the Russell Crowe vehicle The Next Three Days is expected to be as good for his career as A Good Year.

At no. 2, Todd Phillips’ comedy Due Date, starring Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifianakis, brought in $1.04 million – thus remaining barely above the $1m-per-day mark.

At no. 3, Megamind, featuring the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, and Brad Pitt, earned $973k – below the $1m-per-day mark for the first time on Day 14. Even so, Megamind will almost surely pass the $100 million milestone this weekend.

Roger Michell’s Morning Glory, starring Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, and Patrick Wilson, collected $619k in fourth place.

Greg Strause and Colin Strause’s low-budget sci-fier Skyline brought in $475,000 at no. 5, followed by Bruce Willis-Helen Mirren-Morgan Freeman’s Red with $335,000 at no. 6.

Next in line were For Colored Girls, featuring Janet Jackson, Kerry Washington, Thandie Newton, and Whoopi Goldberg, with $310,000 at no. 7 and Tobin Bell’s horror flick Saw 3D with $174k at no. 8.

Rounding out the top eleven were Diane Lane’s Secretariat with $164,000, Tod Williams’ Paranormal Activity 2 with $156,000, Johnny Knoxville’s Jackass 3D with $179,000.

Figures for David Fincher-Jesse Eisenberg-Justin Timberlake’s The Social Network were unavailable.

Among the top-eleven movies, Unstoppable had the highest per-theater average, a none-too-impressive $419. Paranormal Activity 2 had the lowest, $65.

Also among the top eleven, for the second day in a row Secretariat posted the lowest drop-off rate, down 0.4 percent. Skyline — also for the second day in a row – posted the highest, down 15.4 percent.

Photo: Skyline (Rogue Network).

Nov. 18


Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson in David Yates’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1, which is opening at 4,125 locations in North America on Friday, grossing $130 million on its first three days out?

Could Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint beat that other teen idol trio, Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, and Taylor Lautner, whose The Twilight Saga: Eclipse holds the box office record for midnight screenings while The Twilight Saga: New Moon is the current opening-day (and single-day) record holder?

And if weekend estimates turn out to be very conservative underestimates, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 could even surpass The Dark Knight‘s $158.4 million three-day opening back in July 2008.

Worldwide, the current opening weekend record holder is Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which came out in 2009. Three-day total: $394 million.

Not that Harry Potter fans would care, but reviewers haven’t exactly been falling all over themselves in their praise of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1. Among Rotten Tomatoes‘ top critics, Deathly Hallows I currently has a 71 percent approval rating. That’s certainly not bad; but it isn’t great, either.

In fact, “more of the same” seems to be the general take on this latest Harry Potter installment. If you enjoyed the previous Harry Potters you’ll enjoy this one, too. If you didn’t, well, then go check out Sally Hawkins in Made in Dagenham, which is also opening this weekend.

Photo: Warner Bros.

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9 comments

christina -

I AM A BIG FAN OF HARRY POTTER (DANIEL RADCLIF) I AM A REALLY BIG FAN. WELL IF ANY OF YOU PEOPLE WHO KNOW DANIEL RADCLIF TELL HIM I AM A HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE FAN. SINCERELY CHRISTINA SOOT

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tam -

The Unstoppable smells like a flop.

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sarah -

harry potter and the deathly hallows is the best movie i have ever seen and who ever did not watch it should watch it because it is a great movie.

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derek -

dumb muggles if you hate harry potter your a muggle not a wizard i really like emma watson shes hot

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stella -

My husband and I saw the movie this afternoon. I LOVED it and so did he. We were in the mood for a thriller and this hit the spot. There were lots of breathless moments and plot twists.
It my favorite Russell Crowe movie so far!!

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Judy Sherman -

I thought the movie was great! Russell Crowe is an incredible actor who never disappoints, and the movie was fast-moving, packed with action and suspense. Supporting cast also excellent in my opinion. 4 stars!

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nratchet -

Say what you want, we LOVED it! Going back next week. We will also buy the DVD when it comes out and will be there for opening night when part 2 comes out. You guys just don’t get it! Dumb Muggles!

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Selphie -

@annamorphos that’s probably because your town sucks since it’s full of a bunch of lame twihards.

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annamorphos -

Dethrone the Twilight Saga? Really? Cause I just called the biggest theater in town to see if they still had tickets for the midnight showing of Deathly Hallows and they said that 3/4 of the theater is still available. When I called about the same time for Eclipse all the seats were sold out.

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