Home Movie News Jeremy Irvine & Donald Sutherland London Film Critics Awards + BAFTA & Prix Lumière Nominations

Jeremy Irvine & Donald Sutherland London Film Critics Awards + BAFTA & Prix Lumière Nominations

Jeremy Irvine
Jeremy Irvine

Jeremy Irvine, the star (along with the titular character) of Steven Spielberg’s World War I drama War Horse, arrives at the 2012 London Film Critics Awards. Irvine was a contender for Young British Performer of the Year, along with John Boyega for Attack the Block, Yasmin Paige for Submarine, Saoirse Ronan for Hanna, and the eventual winner, Craig Roberts for Submarine.

Michel Hazanavicius’ The Artist was voted Film of the Year. The silent comedy-drama also earned Jean Dujardin the Actor of the Year Award, while Hazanavicius was the Director of the Year. Tying with The Artist‘s three wins was Asghar Farhadi’s Iranian drama A Separation, which received top honors as Foreign Language Film of the Year, Screenwriter of the Year (Farhadi), and Supporting Actress of the Year for Sareh Bayat.

Bayat was a surprise winner, beating the likes of Vanessa Redgrave (Coriolanus), Jacki Weaver (Animal Kingdom), and The Help‘s Jessica Chastain and Octavia Spencer.

Michael Fassbender was British Actor of the Year for both Steve McQueen’s Shame and David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method. The widely acclaimed Olivia Colman was British Actress of the Year for Paddy Considine’s Tyrannosaur and Phyllida Lloyd’s The Iron Lady.

The Iron Lady, about former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, also earned Actress of the Year honors to Meryl Streep – who just a few days ago won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Motion Picture Drama. This time, however, Streep’s Margaret T. had to share her citation with another Margaret, the one played by Anna Paquin in Kenneth Lonergan’s well-regarded but little-seen Margaret. The Best Actress tie is a first in the London Critics Awards’ twenty-year history. Previous Actress of the Year Award winners include Streep (for The Devil Wears Prada), Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman, Judy Davis, Susan Sarandon, Annette Bening, Julianne Moore, and Marion Cotillard.

Kenneth Branagh was the Supporting Actor of the Year for his performance as Laurence Olivier in Simon Curtis’ My Week with Marilyn. The film is set during the time Marilyn Monroe was in England co-starring with Olivier in The Prince and the Showgirl. Actress of the Year nominee Michelle Williams plays Monroe.

And finally: Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk About Kevin, starring Tilda Swinton as the mother of a mass murderer, was voted British Film of the Year. Asif Kapadia’s Senna, about Brazilian racing car driver Ayrton Senna, was the Documentary of the Year. Andrew Haigh was the Breakthrough British Filmmaker for the gay romantic drama Weekend. In the Technical Achievement category, production designer Maria Djurkovic was cited for her work on Tomas Alfredson’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, starring Gary Oldman.

The 83-year-old veteran filmmaker and cinematographer Nicolas Roeg (Don’t Look Now, Eureka, Walkabout) was given the Dilys Powell Award.


Dilys Powell Award presenter Donald Sutherland

The London Film Critics Awards were held this evening in, where else, London. Donald Sutherland was present to hand the Dilys Powell Award to veteran filmmaker and cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, 83, who directed Sutherland and Julie Christie in the classic 1973 psychological thriller Don’t Look Now.

Among Roeg’s other directorial credits are Performance (1970, with Donald Cammell), starring James Fox, Mick Jagger, and Anita Pallenberg; Walkabout (1971), with Jenny Agutter; The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976), with David Bowie and Rip Torn; and Bad Timing: A Sensual Obsession (1981), with Art Garfunkel, Theresa Russell, and Harvey Keitel. For television, Roeg directed Elizabeth Taylor and Mark Harmon in a remake of Tennessee WilliamsSweet Bird of Youth (1989), adapted by Gavin Lambert.

Previous recipients of the Dilys Powell Award include Judi Dench, Julie Walters, Dirk Bogarde, Kristin Scott Thomas, Richard Attenborough, and Quentin Tarantino.

Kenneth Branagh
Kenneth Branagh

Kenneth Branagh was the London Film Critics’ Supporting Actor of the Year for his performance as Laurence Olivier in Simon Curtis’ My Week with Marilyn. Co-starring Actress of the Year nominee Michelle Williams and Eddie Redmayne, the film is set during the time Marilyn Monroe (Williams) was in England co-starring with Olivier in The Prince and the Showgirl. Also in the My Week with Marilyn cast are Judi Dench as Sybil Thorndike and Julia Ormond as Vivien Leigh.

Kenneth Branagh’s competition was composed of Simon Russell Beale for Terence Davies’ The Deep Blue Sea, Albert Brooks for Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive, Christopher Plummer for Mike Mills’ Beginners, and Michael Smiley for Ben Wheatley’s Kill List. Last Sunday, the veteran Plummer (The Sound of Music, The Man Who Would be King) was the Golden Globe winner in the Best Supporting Actor category.

Michael Fassbender
Michael Fassbender

At the 2012 London Film Critics Awards, Michael Fassbender was selected as British Actor of the Year for both Steve McQueen’s sex drama Shame and David Cronenberg’s psychological (and sex) drama A Dangerous Method. Fassbender’s competition consisted of Tom Cullen for Andrew Haigh’s Weekend, Brendan Gleeson for John Michael McDonagh’s The Guard, Peter Mullan for Paddy Considine’s Tyrannosaur and Steven Spielberg’s War Horse, and Gary Oldman for Tomas Alfredson’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

Fassbender was also a nominee for Actor of the Year. He lost to Jean Dujardin in Michel Hazanavicius’ The Artist. The other contenders were Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy‘s Gary Oldman, plus George Clooney for Alexander Payne’s The Descendants and Ryan Gosling for Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive. Last Sunday, Clooney won the Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama.

Jeremy Irvine, Kenneth Branagh, Michael Fassbender, and Donald Sutherland photos via the London Film Critics’ Twitter page.

Tilda Swinton/We Need to Talk About Kevin photo: Oscilloscope Pictures

Bérénice Bejo & Omar Sy: Prix Lumières

BEST FILM
L’Apollonide - Souvenirs de la maison close / House of Tolerance by Bertrand BONELLO
* The Artist by Michel HAZANAVICIUS
L’Exercice de l’État by Pierre SCHOELLER
Le Havre by Aki KAURISMAKI
The Intouchables / The Intouchables by Eric TOLEDANO, Olivier NAKACHE

BEST DIRECTOR
Bertrand BONELLO for House of Tolerance
Michel HAZANAVICIUS for The Artist
Aki KAURISMAKI for Le Havre
* MAIWENN for Polisse
Pierre SCHOELLER for L’Exercice de l’État

BEST ACTRESS
* Bérénice BEJO in The Artist by Michel Hazanavicius
Catherine DENEUVE, Chiara MASTROIANNI in Les Bien-Aimés / Beloved by Christophe Honoré
Valérie DONZELLI in La Guerre est déclarée / Declaration of War by Valérie Donzelli
Marina FOIS, Karin VIARD in Polisse by Maïwenn
Clotilde HESME in Angèle et Tony / Angèle and Tony d’Alix Delaporte

BEST ACTOR
Jean DUJARDIN in The Artist by Michel Hazanavicius
Olivier GOURMET in L’Exercice de l’État by Pierre Schoeller
Joey STARR in Polisse by Maïwenn
* Omar SY in The Intouchables d’Éric Toledano, Olivier Nakache
André WILMS in Le Havre d’Aki Kaurismäki

BEST SCREENPLAY
Bertrand BONELLO for House of Tolerance
* Jean-Louis MILESI, Robert GUEDIGUIAN for Les Neiges de Kilimandjaro / The Snows of Kilimanjaro
Michel HAZANAVICIUS for The Artist
MAIWENN, Emmanuelle BERCOT for Polisse
Pierre SCHOELLER for L’Exercice de l’État

BEST FEMALE NEWCOMER
* Alice BARNOLE in House of Tolerance by Bertrand Bonello
* Adèle HAENEL in House of Tolerance by Bertrand Bonello
Zoé HERAN in Tomboy by Céline Sciamma
* Céline SALLETTE in House of Tolerance by Bertrand Bonello
Anamaria VARTOLOMEI in My Little Princess d’Eva Ionesco

BEST MALE NEWCOMER
Grégory GADEBOIS in Angèle and Tony d’Alix Delaporte
Guillaume GOUIX in Jimmy Rivière by Teddy Lussi-Modeste
Raphaël FERRET in Présumé coupable by Vincent Garinq
* Denis MENOCHET in Les Adoptés by Mélanie Laurent
Mahmoud SHALABY in Les Hommes libres / Free Men d’Ismaël Ferroukhi

BEST FRENCH-LANGUAGE FILM (MADE OUTSIDE FRANCE)
Curling by Denis COTE (Canada)
Et maintenant, on va où / Where Do We Go Now? by Nadine LABAKI (France, Lebanon, Italy)
* Incendies by Denis ViLLENEUVE (Canada, France)
Le gamin au vélo / The Kid with a Bike by Jean-Pierre DARDENNE, Luc DARDENNE (Belgium, France, Italy)
Les géants / The Giants by Bouli LANNERS (Belgium, Luxemburg, France)

And a VERY SPECIAL for the actor-dog (Uggie) in The Artist

Omar Sy, Maïwenn photo via Académie des Lumières

Steven Spielberg & Woody Allen Movies: American Cinema Editors Nominations

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC)
The Descendants
Kevin Tent, A.C.E.
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Angus Wall, A.C.E. & Kirk Baxter, A.C.E.
Hugo
Thelma Schoonmaker, A.C.E.
Moneyball
Christopher Tellefsen, A.C.E.
War Horse
Michael Kahn, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY OR MUSICAL)
The Artist
Anne-Sophie Bion & Michel Hazanavicius
Bridesmaids
William Kerr & Michael L. Sale
Midnight in Paris
Alisa Lepselter
My Week with Marilyn
Adam Recht
Young Adult
Dana E. Glauberman, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
The Adventures of Tintin
Michael Kahn, A.C.E.
Puss in Boots
Eric Dapkewicz
Rango
Craig Wood, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION
Curb Your Enthusiasm: “Mister Softee”
Roger Nygard
Curb Your Enthusiasm: “Palestinian Chicken”
Steven Rasch, A.C.E.
Modern Family: “Express Christmas
Steven Rasch, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
Breaking Bad: “End Times”
Kelley Dixon
Breaking Bad: “Face Off”
Skip MacDonald
Friday Night Lights: “Always”
Angela M. Catanzaro
The Good Wife: “Real Deal”
Hibah Frisina, A.C.E.
The Walking Dead: “Save the Last One”
Hunter Via, A.C.E.

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
Boardwalk Empire: “To the Lost”
Tim Streeto
Game of Thrones: “Baelor”
Frances Parker, A.C.E.
Homeland: “Pilot”
Jordan Goldman, David Latham

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION
Cinema Verite
Sarah Flack, A.C.E. & Robert Pulcini
Downton Abbey, Episode 1.1
John Wilson, A.C.E.
Mildred Pierce, Part 1
Affonso Gonçalves & Camilla Toniolo

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY
Cave of Forgotten Dreams
Joe Bini & Maya Hawke
Freedom Riders
Lewis Erskine & Aljernon Tunsil
George Harrison: Living in the Material World
David Tedeschi

BEST EDITED REALITY SERIES
Anthony Bourdain - No Reservations: “Haiti”
Eric Lasby
Beyond Scared Straight:”Chowchilla”
Rob Goubeaux, A.C.E., Paul J. Coyne, A.C.E., Heather Abell, Audrey Capotosta, Maura Corey, Jeremy Gantz & Molly Shock
Whale Wars: “Race to Save Lives”
Eric Myerson, Pete Ritchie & Josh Crockett

War Horse photo: David Appleby / DreamWorks

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Susan Morton -

Ok…..He is a great actor. All this other crap… he makes for money…Sad…He reminds me of other great actors that take a job just for money. He doesn’t believe going from Hamlet to Troy is a good thing. He knows it is all about money. And that it what is so sad. Sorry. Hamlett to Thorrrr………he is a phony!!!!!! Movie Celebrity.was just Woody Allen talking. He did not learn a listen from the master.

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